Other Voices, Other Rooms: Minimalist Images of Everyday Life

LIGHT CONFIRMS MY REALITY: CHOREOGRAPHED PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGERY BY JEFF WALL

AFTER “INVISIBLE MAN’ BY RALPH ELLISON, THE PREFACE, 1999-2001

This work represents a well-known scene from Ellison’s classic novel, “The Invisible Man.” Wall’s version shows us the cellar room, “warm and full of light” in which Ellison’s narrator lives, complete with its 1,369 lightbulbs. Energy and light, stolen from the electric company, illuminate not only the character’s basement dwelling, but also the truth of his existence. He tells us, “Light confirms my reality, gives birth to my form…. Without light I am not only invisible but formless as well; and to be unaware of one’s form is to live a death…. The truth is the light and light is the truth.”

WITH EYES WIDE OPEN, THERE ARE STORIES TO TELL

LIGHT ILLUMINATES LIFE: PHOTOGRAPHIC IMAGERY BY JEFF WALL

Jennifer Hudson’s Cinderella Oscar Winning Night

Jennifer Hudson’s Cinderella Oscar Winning Night

Jennifer Hudson: On the Academy Awards Red Carpet

Jennifer Hudson Wins Best Supporting Actress (2007)

Dreamgirls Reunion Performance: The 2007 Academy Awards


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And The Oscar Goes To: Dreamgirl Jennifer Hudson!!

JENNIFER HUDSON WINS THE OSCAR FOR DREAMGIRLS

And The Oscar Goes To: Dreamgirl Jennifer Hudson!!

JENNIFER HUDSON IN THE SPOTLIGHT WITH DREAMGIRLS

JENNIFER HUDSON AND JAMIE FOXX: DREAMGIRLS

Jennifer Hudson: Am I Am Telling You That I’m Not Going

Every star under the sun is here. It don’t get no bigger than this,” said Oscar Winner Jennifer Hudson.

From the Newswires:

“Former “American Idol” contestant Jennifer Hudson won the Oscar for best supporting actress on Sunday for her performance as the spurned lead singer of a female trio in “Dreamgirls.” Hudson’s showstopping singing and sympathetic character had made her the odds-on favorite to win the award. It was the 25-year-old’s first movie role, for which she also picked up Golden Globe and Screen Actors Guild wins earlier this year.

“I didn’t think I was going to win. But wow,” Hudson said. She paid tribute to her grandmother “because she was a singer and she had the passion for it but she never had the chance and that was the thing that pushed me forward to continue.”

Just three years ago, she was singing on cruise ships, and her dreams of stardom appeared shattered when she finished seventh on the U.S. television talent show “American Idol” in 2004.

Later, however, she landed the role of Effie White, the hefty, headstrong singer in “Dreamgirls.” The movie tells the story of a group of a black female singers loosely based on the rise of pop stars Diana Ross and The Supremes. Hudson’s rendition of the emotional “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going” in “Dreamgirls” drew standing ovations from some theater audiences.

From: Reuters, 2/25/2007

JENNIFER HUDSON’S OSCAR ACCEPTANCE SPEECH

Jennifer Hudson received her long-predicted Academy Award for her performance in Dreamgirls and delivered a tearful speech to a captivated audience:

“I have to take this moment in. I cannot believe this. Look what God can do! If my grandmother…I didn’t think I was going to win, but wow, if my grandmother was here to see me now. She was my biggest inspiration for everything, because she was a singer and she had the passion for it, but she never had the chance. And that was the thing that pushed me forward to continue.

But I’m so grateful to have my mother here celebrating with me. My boyfriend, my sisters and my brothers back home and I’ve got two of them here. Thank you all for being here and supporting me. I would so like to thank Bill Condon, our director. Oh my god, unbelievable cast. I’d like to thank the Academy, definitely have to thank God I guess again. I can’t believe this. Wow, I don’t know what to say, but I thank you all for helping me keep the faith. Even when I didn’t believe and God bless you all. Jennifer Holliday, too!”

AND BACKSTAGE INTERVIEWS

American Idol” loser-turned-Oscar winner Jennifer Hudson has perfected the art of surviving backstage interviews. Responding to reporters’ questions after receiving her Oscar, Jennifer stated that she was honored just to have been nominated for her supporting role as Effie in “Dreamgirls.” While she felt disappointed that her co-star Eddie Murphy didn’t win, she stated that, “We’re all winners, just for being nominated.” An air of confidence permeated her backstage talk. She shut down reporters who asked about rumored on-set catfighting, and she was comfortable enough to discuss her new house in Chicago. “I’ll put my Oscar next to my Golden Globe, my SAG Award and my BAFTA Award,” she joked. But she’s not gotten too big to forget her roots back home. Hudson expressed thanks for “Idol” and said she plans to continue singing in her church choir in Chicago. “It’s my reality. It keeps me grounded,” she said. Hudson believes that she has her grandmother’s voice. Her grandmother never performed professionally, instead choosing to lead more than 100 solo performances in the church choir. “It’s my duty and goal to do this for her,” Hudson said. “It’s my goal for the world to hear her voice.” And the world is hearing it now.

JENNIFER HUDSON: A REAL-LIFE CINDERELLA STORY

Four years ago, Chicagoan Jennifer Hudson finished seventh among 70,000 hopefuls in the third season of “American Idol.” Unceremoniously dumped from the program at a point when many thought that she was highly favored to win, many were convinced that her dismissal from the show was because some people didn’t think that she was attractive enough.

Who would have expected what has happened to her this year. Hudson suddenly began receiving excited Oscar support from film critics and devoted motion picture audience members from all over the country for her film debut in “Dreamgirls.” And tonight, she was awarded the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her performance as Effie White in Dreamgirls. Hudson, who is only 25, sparkles in a cast that includes Jamie Foxx, Beyonce Knowles and Eddie Murphy. She has an unusual mastery of urban gospel in her voice, a clarity and sense of “truth” that she brings to the character of Effie White in the movie that is based upon the story of the Supremes. Ironically, the original Tony Award-winning version of the stage musical was based in Chicago, although the film version is set in Detroit.

Hudson’s riveting five-octave performance of “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going” is her big moment in the film. Some have said that it is the big moment of the film, period. It belongs to her like the stars belong to the sky. Effie stands tall with dignity after being cast aside by her manager/boyfriend (Foxx) in an unforgettable scene that was filmed over four days on a Los Angeles soundstage. Hudson’s thrilling performance of that song prompted excited talk early on about her being a frontrunner in the competition to receive an Academy Awards Oscar for the Best Supporting Actress performance, especially since Academy members always love a musical.

The rags-to-riches parallels between “American Idol” and “Dreamgirls” are clear. Even Elton John thought Hudson was robbed of the grand “American Idol” prize, saying she was the “best of the lot.” After Hudson got the boot, “American Idol” host Simon Cowell snarled at her, “You get one shot, and the runner-ups; you ain’t never gonna be seen again.” In a recent interview, Jennifer stated, “I’ve had a similar journey as Effie.” “Me being a part of ‘Idol,’ her being part of the group. I was kicked off the talent show. She was the founder and lead singer of the group [The Dreamettes] and kicked off to the background. We both go through our journeys, trying to hold on to our dream and achieve our goal. We have hardships but we prevail at the end.”

Jennifer’s father, Samuel Simpson, died some time ago, but her mother Darnell Hudson still lives in Chicago’s Southside Englewood neighborhood. Hudson’s older brother Jason is a mechanic, and her older sister Julia is a school bus driver. Every time she sings, Hudson thinks of her late grandmother Julia Kate Hudson, who sang at The Pleasant Gift Missionary Baptist Church at 4526 S. Greenwood Street on Chicago’s Southside, where Hudson got her start. Her grandmother died in 1998. “To build my emotions, I thought of her,” Hudson said. “Like, ‘What if she could see me now?’ She used to sing ‘How Great Thou Art.’ I have a recording of Mahalia Jackson singing that on my iPod. I’d listen to it before a song. There was one point they had to stop the cameras, because it was too emotional.”

I never had any voice training,” she continued. “I started in the soprano section of the choir.” Her first solo was “Must Jesus Bare The Cross Alone.” Hudson later sang at Dunbar Vocational High School, which in the past produced music greats like Lou Rawls and Cleotha and Pervis Staples of the Staple Singers. How will Hudson stay grounded through her rapid ascent? “It could have been anybody,” she said. “Millions didn’t make it, but I was one that did. I’m grateful. And I realize Chicago is my home and my reality. I come home and I have to stand in line like everybody else. I love the moment of Hollywood, but you need that reality to smack you in the face.” Yes, she still sounds very much like a Chicagoan.

Jennifer Hudson: I Will Always Love You (54th Annual Grammys)

Whoopi Goldberg: Oh Happy Day!!

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Dreamgirls’ Jennifer Hudson: It’s Oscar Time

JENNIFER HUDSON AS EFFIE WHITE IN DREAMGIRLS

JENNIFER HUDSON

HOPEFULLY AWAITING AN OSCAR ACCEPTANCE SPEECH FROM JENNIFER HUDSON

“I know that she hasn’t won yet, but she’s the frontrunner on nearly everyone’s Oscar predictions list to win The 2007 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress. However, since she’s also the nominee who has the most quickly soared up to celebrity status from a remarkably normal, non-celebrity life, I’m looking to Hudson for the evening’s most humble words.”

JENNIFER HUDSON: A STAR IS BORN

In 2003, Chicagoan Jennifer Hudson finished seventh among 70,000 hopefuls in “American Idol.” But now, Hudson suddenly is getting excited Oscar support from film critics and devoted motion picture audience members from all over the country for her film debut in “Dreamgirls.” Hudson, who is only 25, sparkles in a cast that includes Jamie Foxx, Beyonce Knowles and Eddie Murphy. She has an unusual mastery of urban gospel in her voice, a clarity and sense of “truth” that she brings to the character of Effie White in the movie that is based upon the story of the Supremes. Ironically, the original Tony Award-winning stage musical was based in Chicago, although the film version is set in Detroit.

Hudson’s riveting five-octave performance of “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going” is her big moment in the film. It belongs to her like the stars belong to the sky. Effie stands tall with dignity after being cast aside by her manager/boyfriend (Foxx) in an unforgettable scene that was filmed over four days on a Los Angeles soundstage. Hudson’s performance of that song prompted excited talk early on about her being a frontrunner in the competition to receive an Academy Awards Oscar for the Best Supporting Actress performance, especially since Academy members always love a musical.

The rags-to-riches parallels between “American Idol” and “Dreamgirls” are clear. Even Elton John thought Hudson was robbed of the grand “American Idol” prize, saying she was the “best of the lot.” After Hudson got the boot, “American Idol” host Simon Cowell snarled at her, “You get one shot, and the runner-ups; you ain’t never gonna be seen again.” In a recent interview, Jennifer stated, “I’ve had a similar journey as Effie.” “Me being a part of ‘Idol,’ her being part of the group. I was kicked off the talent show. She was the founder and lead singer of the group [The Dreamettes] and kicked off to the background. We both go through our journeys, trying to hold on to our dream and achieve our goal. We have hardships but we prevail at the end.”

Jennifer’s father, Samuel Simpson, died some time ago, but her mother Darnell Hudson still lives in Chicago’s Southside Englewood neighborhood. Hudson’s older brother Jason is a mechanic, and her older sister Julia is a school bus driver. Every time she sings, Hudson thinks of her late grandmother Julia Kate Hudson, who sang at The Pleasant Gift Missionary Baptist Church at 4526 S. Greenwood Street on Chicago’s Southside, where Hudson got her start. Her grandmother died in 1998. “To build my emotions, I thought of her,” Hudson said. “Like, ‘What if she could see me now?’ She used to sing ‘How Great Thou Art.’ I have a recording of Mahalia Jackson singing that on my iPod. I’d listen to it before a song. There was one point they had to stop the cameras, because it was too emotional.”

I never had any voice training,” she continued. “I started in the soprano section of the choir.” Her first solo was “Must Jesus Bare The Cross Alone.” Hudson later sang at Dunbar Vocational High School, which in the past produced music greats like Lou Rawls and Cleotha and Pervis Staples of the Staple Singers (sisters Mavis and Yvonne Staple went to Francis Parker High School on Chicago’s Northside). How will Hudson stay grounded through her rapid ascent? “It could have been anybody,” she said. “Millions didn’t make it, but I was one that did. I’m grateful. And I realize Chicago is my home and my reality. I come home and I have to stand in line like everybody else. I love the moment of Hollywood, but you need that reality to smack you in the face.” Yes, she still sounds very much like a Chicagoan.

Rex Reed, the New York City motion picture and theater critic, raved about Hudson’s performance in an issue of The New York Observer:

[As] camera-ready as she is, even without makeup, it’s the spectacular Jennifer Hudson as Effie, the Florence Ballard counterpart, who brings the audience to its feet screaming the show-stopping R&B anthem “I Am Telling You I’m Not Going.” In the original Broadway production created by Michael Bennett, this song came out of Jennifer Holliday’s lungs like fire from a blast furnace. History repeats itself here. Different Jennifer, same show-business earthquake tremors.

JENNIFER HUDSON: “I AM CHANGING”

(Please Click Image Above To View Video)

JENNIFER HUDSON: “AND I’M TELLING YOU THAT I’M NOT GOING”

(Please Click Image Above To View Video)

INTRODUCING MS. JENNIFER HOLLIDAY: “AND I’M TELLING YOU THAT I’M NOT GOING”

(Please Click Image Above to View Video)

THE GREATEST SONG EVER FILMED

At the time of the initial opening of Dreamgirls in theaters, Jody Rosen published a review of Hudson’s performance in Slate Magazine, entitled “The Greatest Song Ever Filmed.” This was written even before Hudson had received the Golden Globes Award for her performance in the role of Effie in the movie. In that truly amazing review of Hennifer Hudson’s astonishing performance, Rosen wrote:

“Reading the early reviews of Dreamgirls, you could be forgiven for getting the impression that it’s not really a movie, but a song, surrounded by 125 minutes of padding. You wouldn’t exactly be wrong, either. Reviewers have lavished superlatives on Jennifer Hudson’s showstopping performance of “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going,” just like theater critics did when Jennifer Holliday sang the song in Dreamgirls‘ initial Broadway run nearly a quarter-century ago, and there’s no denying that it is by far the film’s most riveting scene—the one moment, in this musical about music, when a song really grips your emotions. (The costumes and art direction in Dreamgirls are fantastic and period-perfect, but the score’s alleged Motown pastiches are laughably off). The centerpiece, “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going,” doesn’t quite feel like a pop song, even though Holliday’s version topped the Black singles chart back in 1982 and reached No. 22 on the pop charts. There’s a bit too much Broadway in the whimpering little bridge section that arrives at about the 1:20 mark in Hudson’s recording (“We’re part of the same place, we’re part of the same mind“). And the song’s length is clearly a product of staging imperatives. (Hudson spends the first half of the song clutching and tearing at Jamie Foxx). Real pop songs have less slack.

Still, “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going” is an amazing piece of music, which will be blowing back listeners’ ears long after Jennifer Hudson marches off with her inevitable Best Supporting Actress Oscar. The song arrives midway through the film—it was the first-act closer on Broadway—when Effie White (Hudson), the erstwhile lead singer of Detroit trio the Dreams, learns that she’s being dumped both from the group and by her boyfriend, Curtis Taylor Jr. (Foxx). It is a squall of pain and defiance, delivered over swelling strings and gospel-flavored piano chords in series of crescendos: Just when you think Hudson is done, she rears back and delivers another, yet more stirring, skyward-striving chorus. While the pathos of the song is immense, it is dazzling simply as a piece of vocal athleticism. And Hudson has managed to claim the song as her own in spite of the hugely intimidating specter of Holliday’s original. Reportedly, Hudson watched Holliday’s torrid performance at the 1982 Tony Awards dozens of times—talk about overcoming the anxiety of influence.

The result is a cinematic diva moment for the ages: Even Judy Garland’s most iconic on-screen ballad performances seem small compared with the last lingering shot of Hudson, the camera whirling overhead as she blasts out a final “You’re gonna love me!” In fact, “And I Am Telling You I’m Not Going” is a kind of summary of the great American diva tradition, our native answer to the grand opera aria-belters of the old world. The term diva has gotten rather watered down in current pop culture usage, to the point where the title is given to any moderately famous actress or singer with an air of hauteur about her and a personal trainer in her employ. But, in the classical musical formulation, Paris Hilton is certainly no diva—and for that matter, neither is Mariah Carey or Whitney Houston. Old-fashioned divadom entails not just an imperious attitude and a big voice, but a theme—pain, particularly as supplied by callous men and cruel fate—and a task: to transcend that anguish through cathartic declamation. You know the divas of whom I speak: Maria Callas, Edith Piaf, Billie Holliday, Garland, Aretha Franklin, and today’s Queen of Pain, Mary J. Blige. And now, perhaps, Jennifer Hudson.

ARETHA FRANKLIN: RESPECT

The key figure in this tradition is Aretha Franklin. She was the diva who brought the tolling piano chords, dramatically slow-boiling songs, and explosive vocal expressiveness of African-American gospel and applied them to the secular subject of romantic love. It’s there in her greatest ballads: “Ain’t No Way,” “Oh Me, Oh My,” “Sweet Bitter Love,” even lesser, latter-day songs like “It Hurts Like Hell” and her killer cover version of Lionel Richie’s “Truly.” The emotional heft of these songs, and the power of Franklin’s musical genius, is self-evident. But there is more here. Political coding has been the norm in African-American music dating back to slavery, and the political dimension is especially pronounced in Franklin’s work, with its strong gospel overtones. You need look no further than her most famous song, “Respect,” which, through the sheer power of her performance, Aretha transformed from a plea for sexual gratification into a civil rights anthem.

ARETHA FRANKLIN: RESPECT

Of course, a feminist politics is implicit in all diva ballads, with their fervent demands for proper treatment by men—demands that carry special poignancy and moral force in the music of Aretha Franklin and her followers, given the historically heavy burden shouldered by black women. In a society that still hasn’t solved the problems or purged the guilt of its racial legacy, the spectacle of a black woman stormily standing up for herself can feel less like pop song convention, and more like a call to conscience.

Which brings us back to Hudson and her big song. Not a few writers have noted how Effie White’s story grades into Jennifer Hudson’s. In Dreamgirls, Effie is demoted from lead singer duties in favor of the lighter-skinned, thinner, prettier, and slighter-voiced Deena Jones (played by Beyoncé), who incidentally marries the man who fathered Effie’s daughter. Hudson was a favorite to win Season 3 of American Idol, when she was inexplicably voted off. Elton John decried the result as racist, and indeed, it was hard not to see Hudson’s dismissal as a case of the big-boned black girl getting screwed over. So when Hudson tears into “And I’m Telling You I’m Not Going,” she is singing not just for Effie White, but for Jennifer Hudson, American Idol also-ran, and for all African-American women who don’t quite look like Miss USA (or for that matter, Beyoncé Knowles)—not to mention those millions of black women raising children without a man in the house. Of course, the greatness of the song is the transcendence it offers, to those who know Effie’s pain firsthand, and to everyone else. Hudson’s voice booms, huge and bright, rippling with grief but bringing ecstasy. At the screening I saw, the audience gasped and applauded throughout the song, a first in my movie-going experience.

“No, no, no, no,” Hudson sings. Sitting in a darkened theater, you want to cry, “Yes, yes, yes.”

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The 2007 Academy Awards: Oscar Anticipations and Predictions

HOME OF THE ACADEMY AWARDS:  HOLLYWOOD’S KODAK THEATER

RICHARD ROEPER:  OSCAR PREDICTIONS

(Please Click Image Above to View Video)

A LITLE BIT OF SUNDAY NIGHT “OSCAR FEVER”

JENNIFER HUDSON AND JAMIE FOXX:  DREAMGIRLS

JENNIFER HUDSON: I AM CHANGING

JENNIFER HUDSON SINGS:  “AND I AM TELLING YOU, I’M NOT GOING”

Jennifer Hudson’s performance of “And I Am Telling You, I’m Not Going” has been described by one motion picture critic as the greatest song ever captured on film.  In addition, that critic went on to say:

“Not a few writers have noted how Effie White’s story grades into Jennifer Hudson’s.  In Dreamgirls, Effie is demoted from lead singer duties in favor of the lighter-skinned, thinner, prettier, and slighter-voiced Deena Jones (played by Beyoncé), who incidentally marries the man who fathered Effie’s daughter.  Hudson was a favorite to win Season 3 of American Idol, when she was inexplicably voted off.  Elton John decried the result as racist, and indeed, it was hard not to see Hudson’s dismissal as a case of the big-boned black girl getting screwed over.  So when Hudson tears into “And I’m Telling You I’m Not Going,” she is singing not just for Effie White, but for Jennifer Hudson, American Idol also-ran, and for all African-American women who don’t quite look like Miss USA (or for that matter, Beyoncé Knowles)—not to mention those millions of black women raising children without a man in the house.  Of course, the greatness of the song is the transcendence it offers, to those who know Effie’s pain firsthand, and to everyone else.  Hudson’s voice booms, huge and bright, rippling with grief but bringing ecstasy.  At the screening I saw, the audience gasped and applauded throughout the song, a first in my movie-going experience.

“No, no, no, no,” Hudson sings.  Sitting in a darkened theater, you want to cry, “Yes, Yes, Yes.”

 And…I’m Just Waiting for Jennifer Hudson’s Acceptance Speech:

“I know that she hasn’t won yet, but she’s the frontrunner in nearly everyone’s Oscar predictions to win The 2007 Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.  However, since she’s the nominee who has so quickly risen up to celebrity status from the most normal, non-celebrity life, I’m looking to Hudson for the evening’s most humble words.”

OSCAR WINNER PREDICTIONS:

Just in time to feed our 2007 Academy Awards frenzied anticipations, Slate Magazine has come out with its List of Oscar-Winner Predictions:

“Oscar-predicting is a movie critic’s equivalent of paying taxes.  It’s dull, you have no idea what you’re doing, and you’re probably screwing it up royally, but once a year you have to grit your teeth and get through it.  (Watching the ceremony, on the other hand, is always an unexpected kick, like getting your tax refund in the mail.)  To get our conversation going, I’ll stake my bet in a few of the major categories:

Best actress: Helen Mirren.  This is not a prediction but a statement of simple orthodoxy, like “Credo in unum Deum ….”  For anyone else to win it would be one of the biggest Oscar upsets in memory and also, for what it’s worth, unfair.  Meryl Streep’s monstrous fashion editor in The Devil Wears Prada is really more of a supporting role.  Judi Dench does a great job with a poorly written character in Notes on a Scandal.  Penélope Cruz, though she’s divine in Volver, still has to convince American audiences she can act after a string of lousy English-language performances.  Kate Winslet is an actress to whom I maintain a personal shrine, and she’s been shut out five times already, but she has her whole career ahead of her to win an Oscar.  Mirren has been earning hers for 25 years.

Best actor:  I was at a press round table—one of those awkward celebrity junket sessions held in corporate boardrooms—with Samuel L.  Jackson this week, and someone asked him for his Oscar predictions.  He tossed out the two safest possible bets as he left the room: Helen Mirren and Forest Whitaker.  Peter O’Toole is starting to emerge as a dark horse in this category—remember the academy’s perennial pro-old-guy stance—but Sam Jackson is far too righteous to contradict, so I’m going with Whitaker.

Best director: If Martin Scorsese doesn’t win this award at long bloody last, he might as well leave the Kodak Theatre in sackcloth and ashes, holding a sign that reads “The End Is Nigh.”  But it could happen.  Academy voters do love their Clint Eastwood, and Letters From Iwo Jima has more substance and gravitas than The Departed, which, for all its graphic violence, plays in retrospect like a giddy genre romp.

Best picture: In a very split field—almost any of the five nominees could plausibly take the prize, though The Queen would be a long shot—I’d vote for The Departed or Little Miss Sunshine.  (I love the image of these two slugging it out in some allegorical boxing ring: Jack Nicholson with his purple dildo vs. Abigail Breslin in her glasses and Walkman headphones.)  Babel is starting to creep up as a favorite on the big Oscar blogs, but I think people are too starkly divided on that movie (cf. the brutal smackdown Wesley Morris gave me when I defended it in this year’s “Movie Club.”)

Best supporting actress: Either Jennifer Hudson for Dreamgirls or Abigail Breslin for Little Miss Sunshine.  When you get right down to it, academy voters’ hearts are made of gingerbread and moonbeams, and they’ll want to see one of these two charming young women re-enact the Cinderella stories their characters got to live out on-screen.

Best supporting actor: Eddie Murphy for Dreamgirls. It would be really cool if it were Jackie Earle Haley for Little Children or Alan Arkin for Little Miss Sunshine, but child molesters and junkie grandpas aren’t as dear to the academy’s heart as martyred pop stars.

Best documentary: An Inconvenient Truth.  This is a little unfortunate, given that it’s the only doc in the category that doesn’t need the word-of-mouth boost at the box office.  But wouldn’t it be a blast to see Al Gore step up and accept that award while the Hollywood establishment solemnly applauded the planet?  Yay, globe!  Sorry about that whole warming thing.”

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Obama’s an Early Winner in Oscars Sweep!

THE ACADEMY AWARDS: THE KODAK THEATER, HOLLYWOOD (CA)

An early winner in Oscars week will stride up the red carpet in Los Angeles on Tuesday night: U. S. Senator Barack Obama!!  The presidential candidate, who is presently attracting huge and wildly enthusiastic crowds of supporters at campaign stops all across the country, will be the guest of honor at a large fundraising party in posh Beverly Hills, where the number of “top-drawer” celebrities in attendance is predicted to match Sunday’s traditional Post-Oscar bashes.

The reception for Obama on Tuesday, which is being hosted by Steven Spielberg and his DreamWorks studio colleagues David Geffen and Jeffrey Katzenberg, is expected to draw more than 700 of Hollywood’s most influential players, including already declared Obama supporters George Clooney, Matt Damon, Ben Affleck, Oprah Winfrey, Oliver Stone and super-agent Ari Emanuel.

It is not only a major financial salute from some of the most powerful people in Hollywood to the 45-year-old Senator from Illinois and his burgeoning political campaign.  It also represents yet another critical upsurge of support for Obama’s competition against Hillary Clinton for the Democratic Party’s presidential nomination.  You can read more about this major Hollywood coup for Obama in The London Times.

In addition to the private  fundraiser in Beverly Hills Tuesday night and other large Hollywood celebrity donations to Obama, checks have been coming in from the major motion picture studio executives, including Paramount Pictures studio chief Brad Grey; Richard Cook, chairman of Walt Disney Studios, and Ron Meyer of Universal Studios.  Obama has been on a three-day swing through California, his first since announcing his candidacy.  He also held a fundraiser in La Jolla, near San Diego.

New John F. Kennedy Pre-Assassination Film Footage Found

NEW JFK DALLAS ASSASSINATION FOOTAGE FOUND 

Previously unreleased footage of John F. Kennedy’s fateful motorcade in Dallas taken just moments before he was gunned down was released on Monday, a surprising new detail in a saga that has gripped America for four decades.  The brief silent 8mm film shows a beaming Jacqueline Kennedy up close in vivid color waving to the crowd, while a group of excited bystanders waves to the cameraman shortly before the motorcade sweeps past.  The president’s coat is clearly, although briefly, seen bunched up on his back, a detail that some say will be scrutinized by conspiracy theorists who see evidence of a plot in, among other things, the fact the bullet wounds on his jacket and body did not appear to match.

The film was released to coincide with Monday’s Presidents Day federal holiday.  It had been donated to the  The Sixth Floor Museum in Dallas, which is located in the former Texas School Book Depository building where Lee Harvey Oswald shot Kennedy from a sixth-floor window on November 22, 1963.  The museum is devoted to Kennedy’s presidency and the events surrounding his assassination.

Museum curator Gary Mack said that he was not surprised that the owners of the film had taken so long to come forward.  “Everyone who captured the motorcade before the assassination thinks their pictures are unimportant. But to historians, all photos and home movies are important to possibly answer questions that will be asked in the future,” he said.

The footage was taken less than 90 seconds before the fatal shots were fired.  The 40-second film also shows the scene of the crime the following day.  Mack said the new footage offered the best view of the motorcade that he had ever seen.

[Googlevideo=http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=-2038696815763382416&q=en]

VIDEO:  NEW PRE-ASSASSINATION FOOTAGE OF JFK 

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