Photo of the Day: The Absurdly High Roller in the Big Apple

Photo of the Day: The Absurdly High Roller in the Big Apple

Photography by:  Cherry Patter, NYC

ORBO & The Longshots: High Roller

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George Washington: The Loss of All Things

George Washington: The Loss of All Things

George Washington is David Gordon Green’s acclaimed impressionistic Southern Gothic debut film, which one reviewer described as “within a heart-shot of William Faulkner.”  Green won the Best First Film prize from the New York Film Critics, the Discovery Award at Toronto and the Best Director Prize at The Newport film Festival.

David Gordon Green’s feature debut is a seamless blend of subjectivity, pseudo-documentary, evocation of childhood and mythopoeia.  In an impoverished small town in North Carolina, various misfit and poor children converse.  “Look at this place,” one boy says to another. “It looks like two tornadoes came through here.”  The town is dilapidated; one of the “tornadoes” may have been the Great Depression.  Shots of railroad tracks suggest dreams of getting out.  But during the course of the film, death hovers: a boy dies; as a result, another boy feels that God’s judgment is close; another boy almost dies; a boy’s dog dies.  The underlying theme of George Washington is clearly “the loss of all things.”

The videos presented here include the hypnotic opening sequence of David Gordon Green’s auspicious debut film George Washington, another video from the film described as an influential scene in modern cinema and an interview with Charlie Rose, where Green talks about his film George Washington.

George Washington: The Loss of All Things

George Washington: An Influential Scene in Modern Cinema

Charlie Rose: David Gordon Green Talks About “George Washington”

(Charlie Rose Interview: March 8, 2001)

A detailed review of George Washington can be read in The New York Times here.

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Skhizein: The Sad Story of a Man Living 91-Centimeters from Himself

Skhizein: The Sad Story of a Man Living 91-Centimeters from Himself

Skhizein is a humorously strange animated short film by the French filmmaker Jérémy Clapin.  The film has earned several awards, including The Cannes’ Kodak Prize for Best Animated Short and Animafest’s Best Film; it was a 2008 Oscar nominated animated short film.

What would happen if a 150-ton meteorite fell on you? Skhizein tells the very sorrowful story about sad Henry, who did experience the terrible misfortune of being struck by a 150-ton meteorite, which resulted in the poor fellow being split away from himself, forever having to live precisely ninety-one centimeters from himself.  If Harry wants to move or do anything like answer the phone or sit in a chair, he has to measure his distance 91-centimeters (3 feet) away, because he always exists 91-centimeters from where he used to exist.

And if insanity is measured in centimeters….

Skhizein: The Sad Story of a Man Living 91-Centimeters from Himself

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Photo of the Day: The Big Shiny Yellow Checker

Photo of the Day: The Big Shiny Yellow Checker

Photography by:  Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

Late last night I heard the screen door slam,
And a big yellow taxi took away my old man,
Dont it always seem to go,
That you dont know what you’ve got,
‘Til its gone?
They paved paradise,
And put up a parking lot.

-Joni Mitchell, 1970

Joni Mitchell: Big Yellow Taxi (1970)

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A Beautiful Mind: Stephen Wiltshire Draws New York City from Memory

A Beautiful Mind: Stephen Wiltshire Draws New York City from Memory

Steven Wiltshire (born 1974) is an accomplished architectural artist who has been diagnosed with an autistic spectrum disorder.  Wiltshire’s work has been the subject of many television documentaries; neurologist Oliver Sacks praised his artistic work in the chapter Prodigies in his book An Anthropologist on Mars.  Stephen Wiltshire’s many published art books have included Cities (1989), Floating Cities (1991) and Stephen Wiltshire’s American Dream (1993).

Wiltshire is presently working to complete his last drawing in a series of city panoramas, this time of his spiritual home, New York City.  Wiltshire’s collection of  already completed works depicting some of the world’s most iconic cities already includes London, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Rome, Madrid, Frankfurt, Dubai, and Jerusalem.  A 20-minute fly-over Manhattan this past weekend provided the memory for a 20-foot panorama of the city that he’s drawing throughout this week at Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute.  Viewers can watch his progress on a live web cam or visit the Institute while he works from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Monday, Oct. 26 to Friday, Oct. 30, 2009.

A Beautiful Mind: Stephen Wiltshire Draws New York City from Memory

Slide Show: A Beautiful Mind/Stephen Wiltshire Draws New York City from Memory

(Please Click on Image to View Slide Show)

Viewers can watch his progress on a live web cam while he works from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Monday, Oct. 26 to Friday, Oct. 30, here.

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Knocked-Down Dominoes Effects: What Can I Do?

Knocked-Down Dominoes Effects: What Can I Do?

Knock-on Effects (Dominoes) is a 2-minute animated short film created by Yann Benedi and Celine Desrumaux for the World Wildlife Fund.  Have you ever wondered to yourself  “What can I do….?”  You’re not alone!  We all have more power than we think, especially if we act together.  Your actions can make all the difference, and you could be the decisive link in a chain that has important impacts across the world.

In this animated short film, while going about his daily life, Colin begins to have concerns about the environment that he wants to express.  By the simple act of writing, Colin and many others like him end up being able to make far-reaching changes in the wider world.

Knocked-Down Dominoes Effects: What Can I Do?

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Photo of the Day: Even City Cats Have Attitude!

Photo of the Day: Even City Cats Have Attitude!

Photography by:  Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

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