God of Love: The Amorous Misadventures of a Lounge-Singing Darts Champion

God of Love: The Amorous Misadventures of a Lounge-Singing Darts Champion

God of Love is a comical, quirky short film by the funny young writer-director Luke Matheny, which just won the 2011 Academy Award for Live-Action Short Film. Matheny is a New York University film student who also plays the lead in his film, which features several pop-jazz standards and a “Woody Allen-type” humor.

The film follows the amorous misadventures of Raymond Goodfellow, a lounge-singing championship dart player who is desperately in love with a fellow band-mate, but she only has eyes for his best friend. The crooner prays daily to God for a way for his beloved to fall in love with him. Finally, one evening his prayers are answered when he’s given a box of magical darts with supernatural Cupid-like, passion-inducing powers. Raymond decides to attempt using the darts to make his own love connection, which leads to a comic questioning of whether even the gods can force love to happen.

God of Love: The Amorous Misadventures of a Lounge-Singing Darts Champion

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The Lost Thing: A Meditation on Things That Don’t Quite Fit

The Lost Thing: A Meditation on Things That Don’t Quite Fit

The Lost Thing is a widely acclaimed CG animated short film directed by Shaun Tan and Andrew Ruhemann, which is based on a children’s picture book by Tan. The film won the Australian Film Industry Award, the Best Short Film Award at the Melbourne international Film Festival and the top Short Film Prize at the 2011 Annecy International Animation Festival.  The Lost Thing won the 2011 Oscar for Best Animated Short Film.

The wonderful short film tells the story of a boy who finds a misshapen creature on a beach and tries to find a home for it, despite being faced with a world where everyone believes there are far more important things to pay attention to.  The film provides an engaging, tender meditation about things that don’t quite “fit” in this world.

The Lost Thing: A Meditation on Things That Don’t Quite Fit

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JR: The Compellingly Powerful Street Art of a Guerrilla-Photograffeur

Women Are Heroes: Paris

Women Are Heroes: Paris

Women Are Heroes: London

Women Are Heroes: Kenya

Women Are Heroes: Kenya

The Wrinkles of the City: Shanghai

The Wrinkles of the City: Shanghai

JR: The Compellingly Powerful Street Art of a Guerrilla-Photograffeur

The illusive JR has pasted gigantic portraits all over the world, and the public still doesn’t know the artist’s full name. He insists on JR, which are his real initials. He refers to his performance-exhibitions as the mix of photography with graffiti art. His work involves showing up in a shantytown in Kenya or a favela in Brazil, a place where some event has been noted in the media and has captured his attention.  His work turns it inside out, photographing the residents, then wrapping their buildings with the results, on a scale so vast that you can see their eyes from the sky.

Often he works through the night, and as soon as he’s done, he disappears; so when the installation becomes front-page news, there is no one left to explain it but the people whose voices had not been previously heard. As a woman from Kibera, a neighborhood in Nairobi, put it in Women Are Heroes, a documentary recently released in France that JR made about his work: “Photos can’t change the environment. But if people see me there, they’ll ask me: ‘Who are you? Where do you come from?’ And then I’m proud.”

JR’s collection of works entitled Women Are Heroes, features a compelling and empowering style focused on the struggles of women in society today. JR was recently awarded the 2011 TED Prize for Women Are Heroes.  At the age of 28, JR is the youngest recipient of the $100,000 prize.

JR’s latest project is The Wrinkles of the City, an installation of street pieces in Shanghai (and later, in other large cities). The project features images of the elderly, who represent the memory of the city. The photographs have been pasted up at locations that he feels speak to the heritage of a city that has definitely had its share of ups and downs, “from the Japanese occupation, the establishment of the Communist Party, The Liberation, World War II, the end of the foreign concessions, the victory of Mao Zedong over the General Tchang Kaï-Chek’s troops, the Cultural Revolution, the Great Leap Forward to the actual development of the city.

R expo Paris de Women Are Heroes

Women Are Heroes (Trailer)

Meet the 2011 TED Prize Winner: JR

JR’s TED Prize Wish: Use Art to Turn the World Inside Out

Slide Show: JR/The Compellingly Powerful Street Art of a Guerrilla-Photograffeur

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Analog: The End of Professional Photographic Darkrooms and Recording Studios

Analog: The End of Professional Photographic Darkrooms and Recording Studios

Analog is an exhibition at London’s Riflemaker Gallery that invites you inside the last of London’s photographic darkrooms, as well as taking a visit to a working reel-to-reel music studio, courtesy of an installation by Lewis Durham of the band Kitty, Daisy and Lewis.

English photographer Richard Nicholson chose to photograph professional darkrooms because they are often shrouded in mystery, hidden behind the tidy glass facade of the lab’s front desk. The spaces he discovered were often haphazard and brimming with personal details: coffee cups, CD collections, family snapshots, unpaid invoices, curious knick-knacks brought back by globe-trotting photographers. These human elements transformed what might have been a detached typology of modernist industrial design into something more intimate and nuanced.

Many of the iconic images of recent decades were crafted in these rooms. Mike Spry’s high contrast lith prints of U2 and Depeche Mode for music photographer Anton Corbijn, Peter Guest’s black and white prints of the Trainspotting cast for portrait photographer Lorenzo Agius and Brian Dowling’s intricately masked colour prints for fashion photographer Nick Knight.

In Summer 2006, when Nicholson first began to shoot the images of professional darkrooms in and around London, some 204 were still in existence, continuing the printing of image from film-stock to paper within the new digital era. However, when he completed the project some three years later, only 6 remained.

Kitty, Daisy and Lewis: Going Up The Country (Analog Recording)

Slide Show: The End of Professional Photographic Darkrooms and Recording Studios

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Photos of the Evening: Night Tales

In Dark and Mist

Night Watch

Dark Ride Home

The Cemetery

Solitary

Photos of the Evening: Night Tales

Photography by: Tim Corbeel, Belgium

Night Tales is a stunning series of photographs by the Belgium photographer Tim Corbeel. Taking pictures at night is truly an art; you need to have full control over your camera, equipment and the night itself. Corbeel’s nighttime photographs passionately capture the emotions, atmosphere and beautiful moments of darkness.

Adrian Lux: Can’t Sleep

Slide Show: Night Tales

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Sugar: An Unexpectedly Pornographic Catastrophe

Sugar: An Unexpectedly Pornographic Catastrophe

Sugar is an award-winning short film, a very racy black comedy directed by Jeroen Annokkeé at Amsterdam’s Lev Pictures. In the film, young Bert’s scantily dressed, buxom neighbour, Klaasje, comes by to borrow a cup of sugar. When the cup accidentally slips from her hands, they both try to catch it. Disaster strikes as their heads bang together, and Klaasje falls downstairs. From that point on, things just keep getting worse and worse for poor Bert.

Sugar: An Unexpectedly Pornographic Catastrophe

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Lost Youth: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor

Newsboy, “Don’t Smoke, Visits Saloons,” 1910

Young Girl Working in a Textile Mill, Newberry, South Carolina

Boys Working the Midnight Shift, a Glass Factory

A Young Coupling-Boy (12-14 years old) at Indian Mine, Jellico, Tennessee

Children Working at Bibb Mill No. 1., Macon, Georgia

Lost Youth: Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor

Lewis Wickes Hine (1874-1940) attended the University of Chicago and later moved to New York City in 1901, where he accepted a position as an assistant teacher at the Ethical Culture School. At that time, Hine started using the camera as an educational tool and also began to attend the School of Education at New York University.

By 1905, Hine had received his degree from New York University. He continued to photograph for the ECS and while leading its Photography Club, he met Paul Strand. By 1906 Hine was considering a career in Sociological-Photography and began to pursue freelance work with the National Child Labor Committee. In 1908, the NCLC assigned Hine to photograph child labor practices. For the next several years, Hine traveled extensively, photographing children in mines, factories, canneries, textile mills, street trades and agricultural settings.

Hine’s photographs alerted the public to the fact that child labor deprived children of childhood, health, education and a chance of a decent future. His work on this project was the driving force behind changing the public’s attitude about children and work, and it was instrumental in the legislative battles that resulted in the passage of stricter child labor laws.

Lewis Hine: U.S. Child Labor, 1908-1920

Slide Show: Lost Youth/Lewis Hine and the Crusade Against Child Labor

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