Luminous Cities: Creative Explorations of Architectural Structures in Urban Landscapes

Edward Steichen, The Maypole, Empire State Building, New York City, 1932

Andreas Feininger, New York at Night, c. 1940

Eugene Atget (France), Coin de la Rue Valette et Pantheon, 5e Arrondissement, Matinee de Mars, 1925

Stephen Thompson, Grande Canale, Venice, c. 1868

Henry Hart (England), House of Parliament, London, c. 1847-1857

Luminous Cities: Creative Explorations of Architectural Structures in Urban Landscapes

Luminous Cities is a fascinating collection of photographs, which have been selected from a delightful exhibition of photographs of the built environment on display at the National Gallery of Victoria in Melbourne, Australia. The world’s great cities have always been vibrant centers of creativity, in which the built environment is often as inspirational as the activities of its citizens, and since the nineteenth century photographers have creatively explored the idea of the city.

The exhibition enables the viewer to examine the various ways photographers have viewed cities as historical sites, bustling modern hubs and architectural utopias in the 19th and 20th centuries. Through the work of a range of photographers, Luminous Cities leads viewers on a fascinating journey around the world, into the streets, buildings and former lives of some of our greatest international cities.  The many fine photographs presented here, and in the remarkable slide show, include works by renowned photographers Eugene Atget, Edward Steichen, Paul Strand, Berenice Abbott, Bill Brandt, Lee Freidlander and Grant Mudford amongst many others.

Photography in the City: Contemporary Urban Atmospheres

Slide Show: Luminous Cities/Architectural Structures in Urban Landscapes

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

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Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer

Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer

Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer (1944) is the original classic cartoon version of this endearing Christmas tale, which was created by Max Fleischer two decades before Rudolph came to the small screen.  Johnny Marks’ infectious song leads into the well-known story of Santa’s winter weather troubles and how the bullied little deer saved the night.  The other reindeer in Christmastown don’t make Rudolph feel very welcome, constantly making fun of his shiny red nose.  But when terrible weather threatens to keep Santa Claus from making his annual toy-giving rounds, Rudolph is added to the team precisely for that bright nose, which guides Santa’s sleigh through the skies like a beacon in the night.

Rudolph the Red Nosed Reindeer (1944)

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