The 2013 Gay Pride: Supreme Court’s Historic Rulings Support Gay Marriage

The 2013 Gay Pride: Supreme Court’s Historic Rulings Support Gay Marriage

In major victories for the human rights movement, the Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that married same-sex couples were entitled to federal benefits and, by declining to decide a case on Prop 8 from California, effectively allowed same-sex marriages there. By clearing the way for same-sex marriage in California, the nation’s most populous state, the court effectively increased to 13 the number of states that allow it.

In the hushed courtroom Wednesday morning, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy announced the majority opinion that struck down the federal law in a stately tone indicating he was delivering a civil rights landmark. The vote in the case striking down the federal Defense of Marriage Act was 5 to 4, and Justice Kennedy was joined by the four members of the court’s liberal wing. The ruling will immediately extend many benefits to couples married in the states that allow such unions, and it will allow the Obama administration to broaden other benefits through executive actions.

The case concerning California’s ban on same-sex marriage, enacted in a ballot initiative known as Proposition 8, was decided on technical grounds, with the majority saying that it was not properly before the court. Because officials in California had declined to appeal a trial court’s decision against them, and because the proponents of the ban were not entitled to step into the state’s shoes to appeal the decision, the court said, it was powerless to issue a decision. That left in place a trial court victory for two same-sex couples who had sought to marry.

Read more about the Supreme Court’s decisions in the New York Times here.

Read more about the Supreme Court’s Prop 8 decision in the Los Angeles Times here.

Supreme Court Bolsters Gay Marriage Rights

Supreme Court Rulings Spur Celebrations Among Gay Marriage Supporters

Gay Pride Month: Celebrating Loving Feelings for Others

It’s the Dream Afraid of Waking,
That Never Takes a Chance
.”

Harvey Milk: You’ve Got to Give Them Hope

Before there was this year’s Academy Awards celebrated Milk, there was the widely acclaimed The Times of Harvey Milk, which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature Film in 1984, and was awarded The Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, among other awards. The documentary chronicles the political career of Harvey Milk, who was San Francisco’s first openly gay elected Board Supervisor. The film, at times humorous, at times nostalgic, and at other times quite tragic, tells the story of Harvey Milk’s rise to political power and emergence as a symbol of gay political achievement.

The Times of Harvey Milk documents through assembled historic film clips the tumultuous story of Milk’s grass-roots political organizing and election, through the shocking murders and their repercussions. It takes the film’s viewers along with the eloquent candle-light memorial joined by tens of thousands of San Franciscans on the evening of the assassinations, to the scenes of angry crowds who stormed San Francisco’s City Hall in the aftermath of the lenient sentence that Dan White received at his murder trial.

This Academy Award-winning documentary feature film depicts not only Harvey Milk himself, but also the political and social milieu of the era in which he lived. From this perspective, the film continues to have significant relevance for our nation today, standing as a classic portrait of communities and cultural values in severe conflict. The film was produced subsequent to Harvey Milk’s death using archival footage, so that Milk is credited posthumously as the lead actor. Other politicians, including San Francisco’s then-mayor George Moscone (who was assassinated along with Milk) and Moscone’s successor and now United States Senator Dianne Feinstein, also appear in the archival footage. Also featured in the film is then-schoolteacher Tom Ammiano, who has been a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors since 1994, and was elected to the California State Assembly. The film’s outstanding narration is provided by the acclaimed stage and screen actor Harvey Fierstein, who at that time had just achieved great success with his own Tony Award-winning Broadway play Torch Song Trilogy.

The Times of Harvey Milk: The Full Version of the Documentary

Slide Show:The Life and Times of Harvey Milk

(Please Click on Image Above to View Slide Show)

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Gay Pride Month: Celebrating Loving Feelings for Others

Gay Pride Month: Celebrating Loving Feelings for Others

It’s the Dream Afraid of Waking,
That Never Takes a Chance
.”

On What We Need: First Day of My Life

For all of us, there are genuine needs and wishes, deep longings for human warmth, empathic responsiveness, trust, mutual recognition and creative playfulness. These are many of the ingredients that we think of when we speak of love, or the loving feelings we have for the cherished other person.

Of such feelings about a beloved, one might quietly reflect that, “I’m so glad I didn’t die before I met you.”

Bright Eyes: First Day of My Life

The Times of Harvey Milk: A Documentary Portrait

Before there was this year’s Academy Awards celebrated Milk, there was the widely acclaimed The Times of Harvey Milk, which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature Film in 1984, and was awarded The Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, among other awards. The documentary chronicles the political career of Harvey Milk, who was San Francisco’s first openly gay elected Board Supervisor. The film, at times humorous, at times nostalgic, and at other times quite tragic, tells the story of Harvey Milk’s rise to political power and emergence as a symbol of gay political achievement.

The Times of Harvey Milk documents through assembled historic film clips the tumultuous story of Milk’s grass-roots political organizing and election, through the shocking murders and their repercussions. It takes the film’s viewers along with the eloquent candle-light memorial joined by tens of thousands of San Franciscans on the evening of the assassinations, to the scenes of angry crowds who stormed San Francisco’s City Hall in the aftermath of the lenient sentence that Dan White received at his murder trial.

This Academy Award-winning documentary feature film depicts not only Harvey Milk himself, but also the political and social milieu of the era in which he lived. From this perspective, the film continues to have significant relevance for our nation today, standing as a classic portrait of communities and cultural values in severe conflict. The film was produced subsequent to Harvey Milk’s death using archival footage, so that Milk is credited posthumously as the lead actor. Other politicians, including San Francisco’s then-mayor George Moscone (who was assassinated along with Milk) and Moscone’s successor and now United States Senator Dianne Feinstein, also appear in the archival footage. Also featured in the film is then-schoolteacher Tom Ammiano, who has been a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors since 1994, and was elected to the California State Assembly. The film’s outstanding narration is provided by the acclaimed stage and screen actor Harvey Fierstein, who at that time had just achieved great success with his own Tony Award-winning Broadway play Torch Song Trilogy.

The Times of Harvey Milk: The Full Version of the Documentary

Slide Show:The Life and Times of Harvey Milk

(Please Click on Image Above to View Slide Show)

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The Golden Gate Bridge: A 75th Anniversary Birthday Party

Photography by: Thomas Hawk, California

The Golden Gate Bridge: A 75th Anniversary Birthday Party

This week marked the Golden Gate Bridge’s 75th birthday, and there was a day-long party in San Francisco to mark the occasion. The celebration culminated in a massive fireworks display and light show, and the old bridge looks as beautiful as ever bathed in the light of the fireworks. The bridge, which opened on May 27th 1937, is a wonder of engineering and was named one of the modern Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

The Seventh Movement has created The Golden Gate Way, a beautiful time-lapse short film to celebrate the Golden Gate’s Anniversary, with music by Otis Redding, John Lee Hooker, Scott McKenzie and others. It’s a wonderful video postcard of the celebration!

The Golden Gate Way by The Seventh Movement

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen with Scaling Off)

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Helios: The Pioneering Photography of Eadweard Muybridge

Eadweard Muybridge, Ruins of the Church of San Domingo, Panama, 1875

Eadweard Muybridge, Ruins of a Church, Antigua, Guatemala, 1875

Eadweard Muybridge, The Ramparts, Fisherman’s Bay, South Farallon Island, 1871

Eadweard Muybridge, Lighthouse at Punta de los Reyes, Seacoast of California, 1871

Eadweard Muybridge, Bridge on the Porto Bello, Panama, 1875

Helios: The Pioneering Photography of Eadweard Muybridge

Helios: Eadweard Muybridge in a Time of Change is an exhibition at the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (SFMOMA), which presents the first-ever retrospective examination of all aspects of artist Eadweard Muybridge’s pioneering photography. Best known for his groundbreaking studies of animals and humans in motion, what a magnificent photographer Eadweard Muybridge was and what a brilliant eye he had is too often overlooked. In addition to his iconic studies of animals in motion, Muybridge (1830-1904) was also an innovative and successful landscape and survey photographer, documentary artist, inventor and war correspondent.

The works in this exhibition have been brought together from 38 different collections and include a number of Muybridge’s photographs of Yosemite Valley, images of Alaska and the Pacific coast, pictures from Panama and Guatemala and urban panoramas of San Francisco, most of which were published under the pseudonym “Helios.” The exhibition also includes examples from Muybridge’s experimental series of sequential stop-motion photographs, such as his masterpieces The Horse in Motion and Animal Locomotion.

Philip Glass: The Photographer, A Gentleman’s Honor (1983) to Eadweard Muybridge

Eadweard Muybridge: A Stop-Motion Animation

Photo-Gallery: Helios/The Pioneering Photography of Eadweard Muybridge

(Please Click Image to View Photo-Gallery)

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Harvey Milk Day 2011: You’ve Got to Give Them Hope

Harvey Milk Day 2011: You’ve Got to Give Them Hope

Although California is presently the only state with an official Harvey Milk Day, cities all across the country will be holding rallies and events today to honor the first openly gay man to be elected to public office and an icon of the gay-rights movement. Milk, who would have been 81 years-old, gave us his life 32 years ago, knowing that the first of any civil rights movement, who clearly and loudly proclaim their right to equality, most often meets a violent and sudden end. Harvey Milk was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1977. He fought to end discrimination against gays and lesbians and built coalitions of gay-rights groups, labor unions and small-business owners. He was 48 when he was killed a year later by a former supervisor, Dan White.

The Times of Harvey Milk, a documentary film, won the 1984 Academy Award for Documentary Feature. The movie Milk, was released in 2008, directed by Gus Van Sant and starring Sean Penn as Milk and Josh Brolin as Dan White. Milk received two Academy Awards, for Best Original Screenplay and Best Actor. In August 2009, President Barack Obama posthumously awarded Harvey Milk the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his contribution to the gay rights movement stating, “He fought discrimination with visionary courage and conviction.”

Harvey Milk: The Candlelight Funeral Rites

A Documentary on Harvey Milk: 575 Castro St.

Harvey Milk: You’ve Got to Give Them Hope

Before there was the Academy Awards celebrated Milk, there was the widely acclaimed The Times of Harvey Milk, which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature Film in 1984, and was awarded The Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, among other awards. The documentary chronicles the political career of Harvey Milk, who was San Francisco’s first openly gay elected Board Supervisor. The film, at times humorous, at times nostalgic, and at other times quite tragic, tells the story of Harvey Milk’s rise to political power and emergence as a symbol of gay political achievement.

The Times of Harvey Milk documents through assembled historic film clips the tumultuous story of Milk’s grass-roots political organizing and election, through the shocking murders and their repercussions. It takes the film’s viewers along with the eloquent candle-light memorial joined by tens of thousands of San Franciscans on the evening of the assassinations, to the scenes of angry crowds who stormed San Francisco’s City Hall in the aftermath of the lenient sentence that Dan White received at his murder trial.

This Academy Award-winning documentary feature film depicts not only Harvey Milk himself, but also the political and social milieu of the era in which he lived. From this perspective, the film continues to have significant relevance for our nation today, standing as a classic portrait of communities and cultural values in severe conflict. The film was produced subsequent to Harvey Milk’s death using archival footage, so that Milk is credited posthumously as the lead actor. Other politicians, including San Francisco’s then-mayor George Moscone (who was assassinated along with Milk) and Moscone’s successor and now United States Senator Dianne Feinstein, also appear in the archival footage. Also featured in the film is then-schoolteacher Tom Ammiano, who has been a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors since 1994, and was elected to the California State Assembly. The film’s outstanding narration is provided by the acclaimed stage and screen actor Harvey Fierstein, who at that time had just achieved great success with his own Tony Award-winning Broadway play Torch Song Trilogy.

The Times of Harvey Milk: The Full Version of the Documentary

Slide Show:The Life and Times of Harvey Milk

(Please Click on Image Above to View Slide Show)

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For Sock’s Sake: A Sock Absconds to a Sleazy Nightclub

For Sock’s Sake: A Sock Absconds to a Sleazy Nightclub

For Sock’s Sake is a very funny five-minute animated short film by Carlo Vogele, in which some clothes are taken off a clothesline and subjected to a range of cruel and harsh tortures. First, a sock falls from the clothesline and makes a mad dash for the nearby nightclub, suffering the fate of all wasters, philanderers and dilettantes who abscond in search of the nightlife’s bright lights and sleaze. Whether it be to rescue the sock or to similarly indulge, the line disgorges the rest of its clothes and a journey to the darkness and evils of an underworld clubland ensues. The film features graphic scenes of torture and licentiousness: a sleazy raincoat exposes his lining to the rescue party; Trousers, the boss man of the group, is badly-treated by a steam iron; and the poor little sock ends up being hung in chains above a vat of boiling bleach. This definitely is not a movie for the squeamish launderer!

For Sock’s Sake: A Sock Absconds to a Sleazy Nightclub

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Take a Super-Short International Holiday: San Francisco to Paris in Two Minutes!

Take a Super-Short International Holiday: San Francisco to Paris in Two Minutes!

SF to Paris in Two Minutes is a two-minute time lapse short film by Nate Bolt at Beep Show. Bolt took a photograph roughly every two miles between take-off in San Francisco and landing in Paris CDG to make this airplane time lapse.

The photos during take-off and landing are all computer models and totally rendered, since you can’t  use electronic devices during times that the FAA prohibits them. Bolt got lucky and had a whole row to himself to set up the tripod and gear. Otherwise, just imagine how annoying it would have been to sit next to a guy taking a photograph out of the plane’s window every 2-to-30 seconds during an 11-hour flight!

Watch more of these wacky time lapse short films at Beep Show.

Take a Super-Short International Holiday: San Francisco to Paris in Two Minutes!

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