Paperman Wins 2013 Oscar for Best Animated Short Film

Paperman: A Sweet Celebration of Missed Connections

Paperman is a sweet tale of love at first sight, which won the 2013 Oscar for Best Animated Short Film. The groundbreaking 6-minute animated short is a gorgeous black and white classical-looking animation that nostalgically revives the timeless Disney-style of character animation and design. Paperman is the beta test of a potentially momentous shift in animation technology, using a novel new process to create 2D aesthetics in 3D.

Told entirely in pantomime, Paperman is a romantic comedy that tells the story of an ordinary young man who works at an ordinary job, traveling into and out of the city on one of the daily commuter trains. One windy day, he accidentally encounters a pretty young lady, who then boards her own train and vanishes out of his life almost as soon as she entered. Saddened by this brush with what-might-have-been, the man later sits despondently at his desk looking at the huge stack of forms the boss has just dropped into his in-box. But when he happens to glance out the window, he discovers to his great surprise that his dream-girl is at that very moment sitting near an open window in the building directly across the street. What happens next is wonderful, sweet, charming and magical in the best sense of the word.

Paperman: A Sweet Celebration of Missed Connections

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Paperman: A Sweet Celebration of Missed Connections

Paperman: A Sweet Celebration of Missed Connections

Paperman is a sweet tale of love at first sight, which is the favorite 2013 Oscar Animated Short Film Nominee. The groundbreaking 6-minute animated short is a gorgeous black and white classical-looking animation that nostalgically revives the timeless Disney-style of character animation and design. Paperman is the beta test of a potentially momentous shift in animation technology, using a novel new process to create 2D aesthetics in 3D.

Told entirely in pantomime, Paperman is a romantic comedy that tells the story of an ordinary young man who works at an ordinary job, traveling into and out of the city on one of the daily commuter trains. One windy day, he accidentally encounters a pretty young lady, who then boards her own train and vanishes out of his life almost as soon as she entered. Saddened by this brush with what-might-have-been, the man later sits despondently at his desk looking at the huge stack of forms the boss has just dropped into his in-box. But when he happens to glance out the window, he discovers to his great surprise that his dream-girl is at that very moment sitting near an open window in the building directly across the street. What happens next is wonderful, sweet, charming and magical in the best sense of the word.

Paperman: A Sweet Celebration of Missed Connections

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The Snowman: A Magical Journey of Adventure, Friendship, Death and Loss

The Snowman: A Magical Journey of Adventure, Friendship, Death and Loss

The Snowman is a magical, classic animated short film directed by Dianne Jackson, based on the best-selling children’s story by Raymond Briggs. The film premiered on the United Kingdom’s BBC Channel 4 on Christmas Eve 1982, and has aired every year since then. The Snowman won the 1983 BAFTA TV Award for Best Chilcren’s Program and was nominated for a 1983 Academy Award for Best Animated Short Film.

The Snowman tells the wordless story of a young boy whose snowman comes to life on Christmas Eve and takes him on a series of adventures, only to melt into nothingness by dawn of the next day. It is a beloved holiday tradition; for many children of the 1970s and 1980s it was the first program they ever saw that addressed the issues of death and loss.

The Snowman: A Magical Journey of Adventure, Friendship, Death and Loss

A sequel to the silent Christmas classic The Snowman, titled The Snowman and the Snowdog, is scheduled to air this Monday on BBC’s Channel 4, more than 30 years after the original film’s premiere.

A Sequel to The Snowman: The Snowman and the Snowdog

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On the Road with The Kills: Dream and Drive

On the Road with The Kills: Dream and Drive

The Kills just celebrated their ten-year anniversary as a band, but it feels like they’re just getting started. Singer Alison Mosshart and guitarist Jamie Hince have taken their time on their rise from anonymous newcomers to veritable rock stars. Last year they put out their fourth album, Blood Pressures, and played some of the biggest venues of their career. Now, on September 4th, they’ll release a book of photographs, Dream and Drive, taken by their longtime friend Kenneth Cappello.

Photographer Cappello has gotten to know Mosshart and Hince pretty well over the last 10 years. Through lonely deserts and stages crawling with fans and sweat, Cappello captured many of the band’s most public and private moments. “He’s seen it all, the good and the bad, the broken down and the weird,” says Mosshart in the forward to Dream and Drive, Cappello’s collection of photographs of life on the road with The Kills.

The Kills: Fleetwood Mac’s “Dreams” (2012)

The Kills: The Last Goodbye

The Last Goodbye is a powerfully emotive music video portrait of the rock duo Alison Mosshart and Jamie Hince, directed by the Oscar nominated actress Samantha Morton. The Kills celebrate ten years of musical partnership with this poignant and captivating video. The melancholic song The Last Goodbye offsets the usually hard-edged sound that Alison Mosshart and Jamie Hince are known for, with haunting vocals and a nostalgic piano loop. Shot in monochrome on crisp, silvery 35mm film, the video reflects the beautiful simplicity of the track, while using an old-school photo-booth to provide an intimate backdrop for Mosshart’s intense and heart-warming opening performance. Her introduction is followed by a series of touching poses that casts a tender light on the musicians’longstanding and spirited friendship, as Mosshart and Hince share memories of their first meeting and a decade of collaboration.

The Kills: The Last Goodbye

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen Mode)

Photo-Gallery: The Kills: Dream and Drive

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The Kills: The Last Goodbye

The Kills: The Last Goodbye

The Last Goodbye is a powerfully emotive music video portrait of the rock duo Alison Mosshart and Jamie Hince, directed by the Oscar nominated actress Samantha Morton. The Kills celebrate ten years of musical partnership with this poignant and captivating video. The melancholic song The Last Goodbye offsets the usually hard-edged sound that Alison Mosshart and Jamie Hince are known for, with haunting vocals and a nostalgic piano loop.

Shot in monochrome on crisp, silvery 35mm film, the video reflects the beautiful simplicity of the track, while using an old-school photo-booth to provide an intimate backdrop for Mosshart’s intense and heart-warming opening performance. Her introduction is followed by a series of touching poses that casts a tender light on the musicians’ longstanding and spirited friendship, as Mosshart and Hince share memories of their first meeting and a decade of collaboration.

The Kills: The Last Goodbye

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen Mode)

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Paths of Hate: The Destructive Fury of War

Paths of Hate: The Destructive Fury of War

Paths of Hate is an animated ten-minute short film directed by Damian Nenow at Platige Image, which is in the running for a 2012 Oscar for animated short films. The film was named on a list of 10 films that was released last week by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; three to five nominees for the Oscar will be chosen from this list.

Paths of Hate contains stunning visuals that recreate a WWII-era aerial dogfight and presents a dynamic tale about the hatred that seems to be an indispensable element of human nature. Damien Nenow, a recent graduate of Poland’s Lodz Film School, has created a film of great visual power, which brilliantly shows the demons that slumber deep within the human soul and have the power to push people into the abyss of blind hate, fury and rage. The finale of the film introduces a surreal turn of events, which stands as the director’s bitter comment on the bloody destructive fury of war.

Paths of Hate: The Destructive Fury of War

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Peace on Earth: A Post-Apocalyptic World

Peace on Earth: A Post-Apocalyptic World

Peace on Earth is the widely acclaimed classic Christmastime animated short film, which was the masterwork creation of Hugh Harman released during the holiday season of 1939.  Peace on Earth was nominated for the 1939 Academy Award for Short Subjects (Cartoons) and was reported to have been nominated for the Nobel Peace Prize as well.

The animated short was given its widespread public showings immediately after the outbreak of World War II in Europe, and it was viewed as a serious work that dealt with the idea of what a post-apocalyptic world would be like.  In the film, two young squirrels ask their grandfather on Christmas Eve who the “men” are in the lyric Peace on Earth, good will to men.  The grandfather squirrel then tells them a rotoscoped history of the human race, focusing on the never-ending wars men waged.  Ultimately the wars did end, but with the deaths of the last men on Earth, two soldiers shooting each other.   Afterward, the surviving animals were inspired to rebuild a society that was dedicated to peace and nonviolence.

Peace on Earth: A Post-Apocalyptic World

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