An Update/The U. S. vs. John Lennon: His Struggles Are Just as Relevant Today

 

YOKO ONO

INTERVIEW WITH YOKO ONO

On September 5th, an ABC News interview with Yoko Ono by newsman Jonathan Karl was published. Portions of the interview are documented by videos, which follow Karl’s article. His article reported that:

John Lennon’s perceived “threat” to the U.S. government is the highlight of a new film that documents his transformation from pop idol to political activist and offers a fresh look at this former Beatle’s career.

“The U.S. vs. John Lennon” will be released [on September 18th]. Yoko Ono cooperated with the filmmakers, opening her archives of rarely seen footage of the couple’s fight for peace.

“One thing that brought us together was the fact that both of us were rebels in so many ways,” she said.

And that’s something he didn’t always share with his bandmates, who were reluctant to join Lennon as he spoke out against the Vietnam War, said Ono.

“He is the only one who really wanted to do something about it when he was a Beatle,” Ono explained.

Star Watched by the FBI

Lennon’s rebelliousness may have come at a price. In the 1970s, Lennon was convinced that government agents were watching him. As it turns out, he was right.

Almost 20 years after his death, the government released the FBI file on Lennon, which included nearly 300 pages of text. One document that went from the FBI to the CIA reports that Lennon planned to take part in a protest at the 1972 Republican National Convention.

South Carolina Sen. Strom Thurmond seized on that, suggesting to President Nixon’s attorney general that Lennon’s visa be terminated.

A few weeks later, Lennon was given 30 days to leave the country and was notified that his visa had been terminated because of an old drug arrest in England.

“I think that the world really loved the Beatles for being charming and sweet,” Ono said. “But some people did resent the fact that they were no more the sweet, nice, charming boys.”

Ono and Lennon did not want to leave the United States, and a legal battle ensued.

In 1976, after the end of the Vietnam War and the Watergate scandal, Lennon won.

The judge in the case wrote that the British singer’s battle to stay in the United States was a “testimony to his faith in the American dream.”

Not since Charlie Chaplin was driven from Cold War America 20 years before had the feds subjected a superstar to such concentrated attention. Lennon eventually prevailed, but he was effectively neutralized for the duration of the presidential campaign. Among other things, the filmmakers definitively establish their protagonist as the most quick-witted of public figures. You don’t need to be half as sharp to grasp the parallels that clearly apply to Bush’s America.

VIDEO: YOKO ONO: I WAS THAT WOMAN

 

VIDEO: YOKO ONO: HOW WE WERE ALMOST DEPORTED


 

LINK HERE TO SEE THE TRAILER: THE U. S. vs. JOHN LENNON

“The U. S. vs. John Lennon”, a film made with the support and cooperation of Yoko Ono, covers the years between 1966 and 1976, telling the story of John Lennon’s transformation from a beloved musical artist, to an anti-war activist, to a symbolic inspiration for peace. The motion picture recounts the story of the U.S. Government’s strenuous efforts to silence him and his message to the world.

“The U.S. vs. John Lennon” also shows that this was not simply an isolated episode in American history, but rather that the issues and struggles of that era remain significantly relevant for us today.

“IMAGINE”

“A TRIBUTE TO JOHN LENNON”

“ANOTHER TRIBUTE TO JOHN LENNON”

 

One Response to “An Update/The U. S. vs. John Lennon: His Struggles Are Just as Relevant Today”

  1. geoffrey urch Says:

    Hi
    John Lennon, one of the greatest creators of pop songs ever.

    Regards Geoff UK


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