All About Eve: The Photography of Eve Arnold

All About Eve: The Photography of Eve Arnold

Eve Arnold is an American photojournalist who is best known for her benevolent, intimate images of actress Marilyn Monroe on the set of Monroe’s last (1961) film, The Misfits, but she took many other photographs of Monroe from 1951 onwards.  Marilyn trusted Arnold more than any other photographer, a relationship that is well-documented.

Arnold is known for her sympathetic approach towards her subjects, who have included Malcolm X, Joan Crawford and Margaret Thatcher.  She is able to capture a closeness that is not easy for most others to capture.

All About Eve: The Photography of Eve Arnold

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Obama at The Jefferson-Jackson Dinner: A Speech That Changed the Campaign

The Speech That Changed the Presidential Campaign

Obama’s speech at the Jefferson-Jackson Dinner before thousands of Iowa Democrats presented an intense conclusion to the Democratic dinner. This is the speech that changed the course of the presidential campaign.  “Not answering questions because we’re afraid our answers won’t be popular just won’t do it,” Mr. Obama declared. “Triangulating and poll-driven positions because we’re worried about what Mitt or Rudy might say about us just won’t do it.”  “If we are really serious about winning this election, Democrats, then we can’t live in fear of losing,” he said.  Senator Obama, an Illinois Democrat, said the party succeeded if it led “not by polls but by principle, not by calculation but by conviction.”

The Speech That Changed the Presidential Campaign

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In Memoriam: Rest in Peace

In Memoriam: Rest in Peace

Rest in Peace

Rest in Peace, by Helen M. Stummer, documents spontaneous street memorials in and around Newark dedicated to young people killed by gang violence, car accidents or drug overdoses. Ms. Stummer also seeks out relatives and friends of the dead and documents their mourning. The imagery is direct, confrontational and often affecting. The street memorials she depicts range from elaborately decorative wall murals and impromptu shrines to spray-painted lettering spelling out names of the deceased along with the abbreviation R.I.P. Most of the photographs also come with short text panels explaining the imagery and giving a brief outline of the deceased person’s life.

Street memorials painted on public walls are graffiti and therefore illegal. But as one anonymous young person is quoted as saying in a text panel beneath a photograph of a mural on the side of a warehouse building, “It is often all a community has to hold onto.” Though illegal, the graffiti murals serve a purpose common to all public memorials: remembering the dead.

Some loved ones have been memorialized with shrines. Plastic flowers, liquor bottles, balloons, incense, candles, rosary beads, teddy bears and other mementos are often part of such assemblages, surrounding a central photograph of the person who died. The shrines are shown in all kinds of places, from the foot of curbside lampposts to vacant blocks. They are ad hoc funerary structures.

For readers who are interested in learning more about Helen Stummer’s Rest in Peace, please go here.

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