Forever Yours: A Sadly Haunting Tale of Love and Loss

Forever Yours: A Sadly Haunting Tale of Love and Loss

Stephen Kellam’s short film Forever Yours is a visually beautiful achievement. The film was produced with no spoken dialogue. Instead, the film’s emotional message is marked by the tone of its background music, which is melancholy and burdened with sadness. Its haunting echoes serve as a metaphoric reminder that our lives are too often vulnerable to experiences of fragmentation wrought by the undercurrents of dread and ghosts from our past.

Forever Yours begins as a short but deeply disquieting simple story of love and loss during wartime. However, by setting part of the love story in New York City’s now demolished old Pennsylvania Station (which was re-created in the film by utilizing computer graphics) Kellam metaphorically evokes much deeper images and longings than in his classically understated romantic story of love and its collapse.

Suddenly, the film about a soldier dreaming of a rendezvous with his loved one back home becomes, in part, a film about our universal wishes for and dreams about a lost world. In other words, the film makes a sharp descent into the darker realm of reminiscent melancholia.

Forever Yours: A Haunting Tale of Love and Loss

TechnoratiTechnorati: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Please Remember Me and Bookmark This:

Randy Pausch Dies at the Age of 47

Dr. Randy Pausch Dies at the Age of 47

Randy Pausch, the Carnegie Mellon University computer scientist, whose Last Lecture at Carnegie-Mellon was about facing terminal cancer, became an Internet sensation and wrote a best-selling book, died on Friday. He was 47. Alyssa Mayfield, a spokeswoman for Carnegie Mellon University, reported that Pausch had died in Virginia. Pausch and his family had moved there last fall to be closer to his wife’s relatives.

Pausch was diagnosed with incurable pancreatic cancer in September 2006. His popular Last Lecture at Carnegie Mellon in September 2007 garnered international attention and was viewed by millions of people on the Internet. In The Last Lecture, Pausch celebrated living the life he had always dreamed of instead of concentrating on his impending death.

Randy Pausch didn’t want his last lecture at Carnegie Mellon University to be about dying, but he was, sadly, dying of pancreatic cancer. He knew that it’s a painful way to go. When he gave his final lecture at Carnegie-Mellon, he wanted to demonstrate that his focus remained, as always, on living, or on living in the process of dying.

Randy Pausch Dies at the Age of 47

Randy Pausch Visits Oprah Winfrey: No Self-Pity

When there’s an elephant in the room introduce him.”

Randy Pausch Visits Oprah Winfrey: No Self-Pity

Randy Pausch: The Last Lecture

Pausch’s Surprise Visit to Carnegie-Mellon on May 18, 2008

Slide Show: Remembering Dr. Randy Pausch

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

The New York Times columnist Tara Parker-Pope has compiled a listing of many of the best internet links to access important videos and other useful items that make up the online legacy of Randy Pausch.

TechnoratiTechnorati: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Please Share This:

Share

Photo of the Day: Not Green Sleeves, It’s Green Gloves

Music: Green Sleeves

Photo of the Day: Not Green Sleeves, It’s Green Gloves

Photography by: Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

TechnoratiTechnorati: , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Please Remember Me and Bookmark This:

Posted in Art, audio, Humor, Music, New York City, NYC, photograph, Photography. Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , . Comments Off on Photo of the Day: Not Green Sleeves, It’s Green Gloves

For Motorcycles, The Future is Now

For Motorcycles, The Future Is Now

There are several out-of-this-world motorcycles traveling amongst us. This is probably caused in part by the rapidly increasing sales that motorcycle-industry designers and executives are now enjoying, in turn due to the craziness of soaring prices at the gas pump.

To take advantage of this newfound popularity, motorcycle designers are introducing new ideas, with many creatively original approaches to design and functionality. There is a noticeable outpouring of radically different concept and production motorcycles hitting the scene, which challenges our preconceived ideas about motorcycles as we known them in the past.

Many of these bikes are designed like pieces of art, with a conviction that experienced and wealthy motorcyclists would like something more exclusive. The following videos and photo-gallery convey some idea of what many of these creative designs are like.

Yamaha’s Deus Ex Machina and Other Futuristic Designs

The Incredible Yamaha Morpho II

For Motorcycles, The Future Is Now

TechnoratiTechnorati: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Please Remember Me and Bookmark This:

%d bloggers like this: