Elimination Dance: A Grueling Competition of Humiliation

Elimination Dance: A Grueling Competition of Humiliation

Elimination Dance (1998) is a rarely seen short film by the Canadian actor/writer/director Don McKellar. The award-winning short is a dreamy, absorbing confection of archival images, live-action drama, still photography, spoken word and narration. The film takes place in a netherworld where elimination dances have been made illegal, because the unhappy, humiliated losers band together and provoke uprisings among the people and governments just do not like that.

Elimination Dance is set in a crowded dance hall where the Iguana Cafe Orchestra swings and sways. The film revolves around a newly-met awkward couple trying to remain on the dance floor while a caller reads out stranger and stranger reasons (e.g., “anyone who has been penetrated by a Mountie”, “anyone who has testified as a character witness for a dog in a court of law”) why dancers are to be eliminated from further participation. Elimination Dance ends up providing a playfully penetrating (pun intended) view of the comic possibilities of social life.

Elimination Dance: A Grueling Competition of Humiliation

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A Refreshing, Soul-Stirring Emotional Remembrance: Stand By Me

A Refreshing, Soul-Stirring Emotional Remembrance: Stand By Me

Stand By Me is a musical short film that is the first part of the award-winning, immensely popular documentary Playing For Change: Peace Through Music by Mark Johnson. Playing for Change: Peace Through Music debuted at the 2008 Tribecca Film Festival in New York and won the Audience Award at the Woodstock Film Festival. The documentary is a multimedia movement created to inspire, connect, and bring peace to the world through music. The project arose from a belief that music has the power to break down boundaries and overcome distances between people, and was produced to benefit worthy causes, including AIDS charities in Africa.

Stand By Me is an emotionally powerful rendition of the Ben E. King classic, performed by musicians from around the world adding their parts to the song as it traveled the globe. It features the fine baritone of New Orleans street musician Grandpa Elliott Small, as well as Washboard Chaz and Roberto Luti also from New Orleans. The dizzying array of performers also includes street musicians making contributions to this amazing, soul-stirring performance from as far away as the Netherlands, France, Spain, Brazil, Moscow, South Africa and the Congo.

A Refreshing, Soul-Stirring Emotional Remembrance: Stand By Me

Slide Show: A Refreshing, Soul-Stirring Emotional Remembrance/Stand By Me

(Please Click Image Above to View Slide Show)

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