All that is Solid Melts into the Air: Why is this So Good? Why??

All that is Solid Melts into the Air: Why is this So Good? Why??

All that is solid,
turns into dust.

All that is Solid Melts into the Air is a 1-minute short film that was directed, designed and animated by Marco Vinicio Morales at Kult Nation.  Morales describes the film as a visual and poetic journey influenced by art, design, architecture and photography.  It illustrates a process whereby under the violent irruption of forms and structures, everything flows towards a constant evolution.

All that is Solid Melts into the Air: Why is this So Good? Why??

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Road to Moloch: Into the Horrifying Cave of Ancient Evil Incarnate

Road to Moloch: Into the Horrifying Cave of Ancient Evil Incarnate

Well we know where we’re goin,
But we don’t know where we’ve been,
And we know what we’re knowin,
But we can’t say what we’ve seen.

Road to Moloch is a supernatural action-horror short film by filmmaker Robert Glickert.  In recent times, not surprisingly, there have been a number of feature-length horror films set in contemporary war hot-spots, especially in Iraq and Afghanistan.  But what those films set out to do in 90-odd minutes, Glickert’s Road to Moloch manages to accomplish in 16-minutes, and with considerable force.  While on a mission to locate three missing American soldiers, a team of reconnaissance marines encounters a blood-spattered Iraqi stumbling through the desert.  After following the distraught man into the depths of an insurgent cave, the marines make some horrifying discoveries that bring them face-to-face with what may be the home of ancient evil incarnate.  Playing around with the cliches of action and horror movies, Road to Moloch manages to be a highly entertaining piece of filmmaking, if you can withstand the splatter and carnage.

Road to Moloch: Into the Horrifying Cave of Ancient Evil Incarnate

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Photo of the Day: The Waiter’s Lousy Break

Photo of the Day: The Waiter’s Lousy Break

Photography by:  Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

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Drift Away: A Slow Glide Through Misery’s Homeless Mind

Drift Away: A Slow Glide Through Misery’s Homeless Mind

In each individual the spirit is made flesh,
in each one the whole of creation suffers,
in each one a Savior is crucified.

Hermann Hesse, Demian

Drift Away is a beautiful, but sadly melancholy 4-minute short film directed by Jean-Julien Pous and produced by Sophia Shek.  During the course of the film, a gracious and ethereal young woman slowly glides silently and all alone through the busily teeming streets of Hong Kong.  During the earliest part of the film, it’s somewhat difficult to discern exactly what’s going on in this little film, or even what the movie’s theme might be, except possibly a visual rendering of the emotional deadness of anomie and anhedonia in contemporary urban life.  The attractive young woman’s eyes acutely capture everything around her, but only the movie’s camera can catch her own eyes.  Sadly, it’s probably true that only when you’re really able to lose yourself in something or someone else, only then will you finally become capable of an emotional investment in yourself, another person and/or the world around you.  Lacking that, the despairing message for people left with a desolately barren life in the midst of the intensely seething modern world is something like: “Pour your misery down, pour your misery down on me.”

Drift Away: A Slow Glide Through Misery’s Homeless Mind

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