The Curse: A Quietly Devastating Love Story

The Curse: A Quietly Devastating Love Story

He opens his eyes
Falls in love at first sight
With the girl in the doorway
What beautiful lines
Heart full of life
After thousands of years,
What a face to wake up to.

The Curse is a painfully poignant song from the Americana singer-songwriter Josh Ritter’s latest album, So Runs the World Away.  The song tells the tale of a heart-breaking romance, which is brilliantly paired with the handcrafted creation and vision of marionette-puppeteer extraordinaire Liam Hurley, who is also Josh Ritter’s drummer.

Both the lyrics and doleful music strike a mesmerizing chord that’s movingly evocative of our contemporary  world, which is increasingly inhabited by people who are transient, lonely and ever on the search for something.  The Curse follows the course of a seemingly unlikely love affair between a mummy and a Victorian archaeologist.  The progression of their romance is quietly devastating, where the mummy’s curse turns out to be a poetic parable for the mournfully melancholy realization that love is mortal.

The Curse: A Quietly Devastating Love Story

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Elevated Madness: Trapped by Terrifying Monsters From Both Within and Without

Elevated Madness: Trapped by Terrifying Monsters From Both Within and Without

Elevated is a phenomenal horror-thriller short film by the Canadian director Vincenzo Natali.  The  film focuses on three people who suddenly find themselves trapped in an elevator, fearing that there’s something terrible lurking outside to kill them.  They’re trapped in the box, not knowing if leaving it will be suicide, or whether help is ever coming if they stay, or whether the monster is actually inside the elevator.

A mind-bending sense of excitement and aura of sheer madness escalates in the face of increasingly unbearable feelings of claustrophobia and uncertainty, two terrifying emotions almost universal to the human condition.  Arising from this desperate situation, the film reveals the manner in which we so quickly revert to primitive states of existence when confronted by such life threatening scenarios.  When tormented by apocalyptic fears about potential disaster, the film makes explicit both our innate distrust of others and our regression to panicked devaluations of one another, especially in a world increasingly characterized by an ever-growing dependence upon technology.

Elevated Madness: Trapped by Terrifying Monsters From Both Within and Without

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