Portraits of Life and Loss: The Holocaust and Beyond

Portraits of Life and Loss: The Holocaust and Beyond

Photographs by: Jeffrey Gusky, MD, Mt. Vernon, Texas

Portraits of Life and Loss pairs the work of Roman Vishniac and Jeffrey Gusky, two photographers who wandered the same areas some six decades apart.  Vishniac explored Poland’s Jewish villages of the 1930s and 1940s, documenting communities in peril during an era of growing anti-Semitism.  Gusky’s late-20th-century visits to the same country took him to the sites where those communities once stood.

While Vishniac captured the spirit of a people, their crowded, vibrant communities, pulsing with life, Gusky’s visual journey examines the ghosts they left behind.  Returning to the quiet landscapes that once nourished Jewish life, Gusky found crumbling synagogues, ghetto walls, and silent streets that once hosted bustling markets, and his photographs resound hauntingly, with an almost specter-like aura.

Photographs by Roman Vishniac: A Vanished World

Gorecki Symphony No. 3, “Symphony of Sorrowful Songs”

Slide Show: Portraits of Life and Loss/The Holocaust and Beyond

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

Please Share This:

Share

Hurry Up and Wait: The Lonesome World of Truck Drivers

Hurry Up and Wait: The Lonesome World of Truck Drivers

Hurry Up and Wait is a photographic essay by artists James Tribble and Tracey Mancenido-Tribble, a poetic meditation about America’s trucking culture.  With the long tradition of road photography in mind, the Tribbles spent over a year driving across the states as truck drivers.  Their journey is documented here in photographs that range from portraits of drivers they encountered, to shots from the open road, in a year-long effort to understand the subculture that literally drives America’s consumerism.  The photographs illuminate both the openness of the road and it’s lonesome journey, with images that bring new light to the harsh beauty in the world of a truck driver.

Kris Kristofferson: This Old Road

Slide Show: The Lonesome World of Truck Drivers

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

Please Share This:

Share

In Almost Every Picture: The Shooting Gallery

In Almost Every Picture: The Shooting Gallery

In Almost Every Picture: Shooting Gallery is a chronological series of photographs that began in 1936, when a 16 year-old Dutch girl picked up a gun and shot at the target in a fairground shooting gallery.  When she hit the target, it triggered the shutter of a camera, and a portrait of the girl in the firing pose was taken and given as a prize.  Ria van Dijk has continued to shoot her own portrait for the past seventy years.  She has used a rifle rigged to a camera at the various fairs she’s attended, getting a photograph every time she hit the bull’s-eye.  This series documents almost every year of the woman’s life up until present times, and at the age of 88 she still makes her pilgrimages to the Shooting Gallery.

In Almost Every Picture: The Shooting Gallery

Slide Show: In Almost Every Picture/The Shooting Gallery

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

Please Share This:

Share

Frankie: A 15 Year-Old Boy Attempts to Overcome His Circumstances

Frankie: A 15 Year-Old Boy Attempts to Overcome His Circumstances

Frankie is an award-winning short film directed by the Irish filmmaker Darren Thornton, produced for Calipo Pictures.  Frankie is 15 years-old and preparing for fatherhood.  He’s determined to be the best dad ever: he reads up on prenatal care, buys baby clothes, and lugs a baby doll around for practice.  However, as his day goes on, Frankie begins to realize how impossible this might be for him.  Stacked against him is an absence of role models; Frankie’s own father deserted him when he young, and as he carts the doll around town, Frankie points out the extent of the social meltdown in his Irish town.

It is easy for a film with this subject matter to play it sentimentally sweet.  If Frankie can overcome his circumstances, it becomes an inspiring story of maturity, responsibility and man’s ability to overcome his surroundings.  But Frankie’s on the fast track to becoming a piece of work himself.  Rebellious by nature, conflict follows him wherever he goes: the clinic where he tries to take a lamaze class, the courts which he frequents for shoplifting and fighting, and the school from which he already has dropped out.  While we cheer the earnest sincerity in Frankie’s voice about his wishes for self-improvement, the film remains ambiguous and doesn’t encourage us to have blind faith in happy endings.

Frankie: A 15 Year-Old Boy Attempts to Overcome His Circumstances

Please Share This:

Share

%d bloggers like this: