Up Close: Photographs of Candid Intimacy

Up Close: Photographs of Candid Intimacy

Up Close is a collection of photographs on exhibition at Australia’s Heide Museum of Modern Art, featuring the exceptional talent of four photographers whose images capture people, places and events with candid intimacy.  Up Close traces the significant legacy of Australian photographer Carol Jerrems (1949–1980) alongside that of contemporary artists Larry Clark (USA), Nan Goldin (USA) and William Yang (Sydney).  The collection takes its inspiration from the way each artist candidly depicts a social milieu and urban life of the 1970s and early 1980s.  Sharing an interest in sub-cultural groups and individuals on the margins of society, each artist reveals a remarkable capacity to provide an empathetic glimpse into semi-private worlds through intimate depictions of people and their surroundings.

Jerrems’ photography was associated with a feminist and political imperative, a preoccupation with  subcultures, forgotten and dispossessed groups, especially Aboriginal communities of the time.  Larry Clark unflinchingly turned the camera onto himself and his amphetamine-shooting coterie to produce Tulsa (1971), a series of photographs repeatedly cited for its raw depiction of marginalized youth.  With its grainy shot-from-the-hip style, Tulsa exposes a world of sex, death, violence, anxiety and boredom capturing the aimlessness and ennui of teenagers.

Larry Clark’s work influenced Nan Goldin and a whole generation of artists who aspired to break with the more traditional documentary modes.  Mining the emotional depths of her friends, lovers and family, Goldin’s work reveals a riveting intimacy while  uncovering the bohemian life of New York’s Lower East Side.  Goldin says, “I was documenting my life.  It comes directly from the snapshot, which is always about love.”

William Yang’s photographs from the 1970s further the snapshot aesthetic through journeying into the intimate world of his particular social milieu: drag queens, Sydney gay and inner-city culture.  Yang’s direct, unpretentious photographs provide a unique chronicle of marginalised groups especially as he put it: “…people who are gay, who were invisible, who were too scared to come out.  During gay liberation people became visible, people became politicized, and there was a Mardi Gras that was a symbol of the movement.”

Girl in a Mirror: A Portrait of Carol Jerrems

Tulsa: The Photography of Larry Clark

Slide Show: Up Close/Photographs of Candid Intimacy

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

Please Share This:

Share

She Farted and Created the World!

She Farted and Created the World!

She Farted and Created the World is a curiously humorous two-minute animated short film by animator/creator Scott Coello, which was shortlisted for the 2009 Virgin Media Shorts Awards.  A big puppy farts, and lo, a whole new universe is born, setting into motion an unprecedented cycle of evolution.  Yes, it turns out to be the Red Queen Model of co-evolutionary interaction, which holds that the struggle for existence never eases up, so that no species ever pulls ahead for long.  The music is provided by a band named Son of Robot.

She Farted and Created the World!

Please Share This:

Share

Moon: A Little Boy Comforts the Freezing Moon

Moon: A Little Boy Comforts the Freezing Moon

Moon is a delightful, superbly realized animated short film created by Melanie Horn, which was shortlisted for the 2010 Virgin Media Shorts Awards.  The film tells the story of a little boy and the moon, both of whom are feeling very lonely on their own.  The boy lives in a big house in the mountains and worries that the moon is very cold.  Wanting to become friends with the freezing moon, one wintry night the little boy decides to embark on a journey up into the darkened evening sky to pay it a visit.

Moon: A Little Boy Comforts the Freezing Moon

Please Share This:

Share

A Joyously Bloody Work Anthem: Kill Your Co-Workers!

A Joyously Bloody Work Anthem: Kill Your Co-Workers!

Kill Your Co-Workers is a wonderful animated robot music video created by “beeple,” aka Mike Winkleman, for the song by Flying Lotus.  The video begins with a cheerfully sunny small town parade, complete with happy spectators, fancy floats and “rainbows are yummy” signs.  But soon, things get a little bloody, ending up with with some gruesome pixelated mayhem!

A Joyously Bloody Work Anthem: Kill Your Co-Workers!

Please Share This:

Share

Burden: A Lone Man’s Defiant Battle to Save Earth

Burden: A Lone Man’s Defiant Battle to Save Earth

Burden is a widely acclaimed, spectacular short film directed by Michael David Lynch, a seven-minute film that looks just like a big-budget, popcorn-selling, comic-inspired, extravaganza blockbuster.  Burden follows the exploits of a super-powered “Watcher” named Calik, who was sent to Earth some forty years ago to observe the growth of our young species.  He’s informed that an alien race called the Cythorians is en-route to destroy Earth and finds himself torn between his sworn duty to leave Earth and allow the world to fall, or to defy his orders by remaining to fight in what seems like a futile battle to save the planet.

Burden: A Lone Man’s Defiant Battle to Save Earth

Please Share This:

Share

Last Minutes with Oden: The Experience of Loss and Grief

Last Minutes with Oden: The Experience of Loss and Grief

Last Minutes with Oden is a deeply engaging, extremely heart-wrenching 6-minute short documentary directed and edited by Eliot Rausch, in association with PhosPictures. The film tells a story about Jason Wood (Woody), an ex-convict who is saying a final farewell to his best friend, the man’s last minutes with his dog before he has to have it euthanized for health reasons. The documentary is a beautiful elegy that calls attention to certain heartbreaking moments most of us experience, and which is an incredibly powerful reminder of the importance of family and friendships in all our lives.

Last Minutes with Oden was named Best Documentary and Best Video at the 2010 Vimeo Awards, chosen from over 6500 film and video submissions.  The 2010 Vimeo Awards site can be viewed here.

Last Minutes with Oden: The Experience of Loss and Grief

5 Hours with Woody: Three years before Last Minutes with Oden

Please Share This:

Share

Harry Callahan: A Retrospective Collection of Later Color Photography

Harry Callahan: A Retrospective Collection of Later Color Photography

An American original and a self-taught photographer, Harry Callahan (1912-1999) was one of the first to do strictly art photography.  Callahan became a major figure in American photography by means of his genius and work ethic.  His photography was his life in many ways, and he told his life through his photography.

Callahan’s only education in photography consisted of attending lectures while a member of the Detroit Photo Guild.  He experienced an exhibit of the photographs of Ansel Adams as an inspiration, and was similarly moved by the work of Alfred Stieglitz.  Within eight years he’d become one of America’s most eloquent poets of the camera. Through the invitation of Lazlo Moholy-Nagy, Callahan become part of the teaching staff of Chicago’s Institute of Design, a continuation of the Bauhaus school of thinking about art that blended in the work of artisans with the fine arts.

From the late 1940s to early 1960s, his central model and muse was his wife Eleanor Callahan, and after 1950, his daughter Barbara.  By the 1970s he had begun to focus on color photography, and a number of those works are represented in this collection.

A Documentary Interview: Harry Callahans’s Visions and Images

Slide Show: Harry Callahan’s Later Color Photography

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

Please Share This:

Share

%d bloggers like this: