The Adventures of a Cardboard Box: Humorous Play and Melancholy Loss

The Adventures of a Cardboard Box: Humorous Play and Melancholy Loss

The Adventures of a Cardboard Box is a fascinating short film by English illustrator and filmmaker Temujin Doran, which was named a finalist in the 2011 Nokia Shorts Video Contest. Thousands of videos from around the world were submitted and judged over a four month period, and from those seven films were selected as finalists. The seven finalists were screened and judged at the 2011 Edinburgh International Film Festival.

Temujin’s short film has been described rather simply as the story of one boy’s escapades with a large cardboard box, which he uses as a gateway to a multitude of fantasy adventures. The film is, of course, much more than that; it is no accident that Temujin cited the Calvin and Hobbes comic strip as the main inspiration for his film. As with the major underlying theme of Calvin and Hobbes, this film can be viewed as a contemporary narrative about one young boy’s uses of a transitional object in his play and illusions as explorations of ideas about identity and the self. Ultimately, the film becomes a perfect combination of humor and melancholy loss.

The Adventures of a Cardboard Box: Humorous Play and Melancholy Loss

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Gorgeous Tattooed Burlesque Beauties

Gorgeous Tattooed Burlesque Beauties

Tattooed Beauty: APG Burlesque is a very sexy three-minute short film created by Daniel Dragon Films. The scenes of the beautiful tattooed burlesque ladies were filmed at The Goat Farm with the Atlanta Photography Guild’s Burlesque Camera Club. Enjoy!!

Gorgeous Tattooed Burlesque Beauties

(Best Watched in HD Full-Screen Mode)

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A Home Full of Art: A Consumerist Nightmare

Paintings by: Jessica Rohrer

A Home Full of Art: A Consumerist Nightmare

Oakridge Road is a series of paintings by Jessica Rohrer, which is currently on exhibition at New York City’s PPOW Gallery. The paintings are meticulous, stylized portraits of her home’s interiors and domestic commodities, which have the visual lure of advertising, but they’re not selling anything, merely asking you to look.

A highly organized closet filled with clothes, a collection of every brand of cleaning product you can imagine, a totally antiseptic kitchen, the cornucopia of processed foods in the refrigerator, the dining room and its empty furniture, views out windows of the perfect neighborhood: all this and much more Ms. Rohrer paints with an almost eerie objectivity. In this vacuum-sealed artificial paradise, utopia turns into dystopia, the American Dream becomes a consumerist nightmare.

Read more about this exhibition in The New York Times here.

Photo-Gallery: A Home Full of Art/A Consumerist Nightmare

(Please Click Image to View Photo-Gallery)

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