Bunny Magic: The Most Spectacular Magic Hat Trick Ever!

Bunny Magic: The Most Spectacular Magic Hat Trick Ever!

Bunny Magic is a delightfully funny animated short film created by Philip Watts. It’s the oldest, but here the most spectacular hat trick ever seen. The talented magician performs his own version of “the bunny out of the hat” trick before a large, entranced audience. What could go wrong? Well, just watch and see!

Bunny Magic: The Most Spectacular Magic Hat Trick Ever!

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Bless You: Setting the Hungry Cat Amongst the Pigeons

Bless You: Setting the Hungry Cat Amongst the Pigeons

Bless You is a delightfully humorous animated short film by Philip Watts. The little film tells the story of an urban architect, who decides his architectural model needs to be spiced up quite a bit. Bless You ends up being a very cunning mix of traditional animation, tilt-shift photography and something pretty much like Flash. Ultimately, the film is great fun and executed with great panache.

Bless You: Setting the Hungry Cat Amongst the Pigeons

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The Golden Gate Bridge: A 75th Anniversary Birthday Party

Photography by: Thomas Hawk, California

The Golden Gate Bridge: A 75th Anniversary Birthday Party

This week marked the Golden Gate Bridge’s 75th birthday, and there was a day-long party in San Francisco to mark the occasion. The celebration culminated in a massive fireworks display and light show, and the old bridge looks as beautiful as ever bathed in the light of the fireworks. The bridge, which opened on May 27th 1937, is a wonder of engineering and was named one of the modern Wonders of the World by the American Society of Civil Engineers.

The Seventh Movement has created The Golden Gate Way, a beautiful time-lapse short film to celebrate the Golden Gate’s Anniversary, with music by Otis Redding, John Lee Hooker, Scott McKenzie and others. It’s a wonderful video postcard of the celebration!

The Golden Gate Way by The Seventh Movement

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen with Scaling Off)

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Invincible Cities: Harlem’s Painted Lady on East 125th Street

Invincible Cities: 65 East 125th St. (1977)

Invincible Cities: 65 East 125th St. (1977)

Invincible Cities: 65 East 125th St. (1990)

Invincible Cities: 65 East 125th St. (1998)

Invincible Cities: 65 East 125th St. (2001)

Invincible Cities: 65 East 125th St. (2007)

Invincible Cities: 65 East 125th St. (2009)

Invincible Cities: 65 East 125th St. (2009)

Invincible Cities: Harlem’s Painted Lady on East 125th Street

The ghetto poses urgent questions I feel compelled to respond to,
Not with solutions but with explanations and tangible records.
I am driven to publicize and preserve the memory of these environments.
–Camilo José Vergara

Camilo José Vergara has spent more than thirty years documenting poor, urban and minority neighborhoods across the United States. His projects emerge from a large archive of images he has made since 1977 of the nation’s largest ghettos. His exhaustive research has taken him to Camden and Newark, New Jersey; Chicago, Illinois; Detroit, Michigan; Gary, Indiana; Maine; New York; and Los Angeles. Vergara takes his camera to places plagued by the drug trade, and to neighborhoods filled with homeless shelters, prisons, and drug treatment facilities. He is a prolific photographer who continues to live in New York City. Vergara has been the recipient of a MacArthur Foundation Genius Grant.

Vergara describes his approach as interdisciplinary, using techniques from fields that include sociology, architecture, photography, urban planning, history and anthropology. He has focused upon the gradual erosion of urban neighborhoods by photographing the same structures repeatedly over decades in order to capture the process of of urban decay. The photography presented here is from Vergara’s project entitled Invincible Cities. He returned to the same intersection in Harlem and photographed the changes in one building for 38 years. The images create a composite, time-lapse portrait of one of New York City’s most vibrant and distinctive areas.

Camilo Vergara Documents the Changing Urban Landscape

Photo-Gallery: Invincible Cities: Harlem’s Painted Lady on East 125th Street

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The Street Photography of Alex Webb: Sweet Home Chicago

The Street Photography of Alex Webb: Sweet Home Chicago

Photography by: Alex Webb

Photographs from the Streets of Chicago is a wonderful video photo-essay, a collection of photographs by the acclaimed contemporary street photographer, Alex Webb. Unlike street photographers of the Chicago School (Callahan, Metzger, Sturr and Sterling), Alex Webb has chosen to photograph the city’s multitudinous character in color. Having spent most of his three-decades long career shooting outside of the United States, Webb turns his lens to Chicago during this very important election year.

The Street Photography of Alex Webb: Sweet Home Chicago

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen Mode)

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A Tribute of Remembrance and Honor: The National September 11 Memorial

A Tribute of Remembrance and Honor: The National September 11 Memorial

The National September 11 Memorial is a tribute of remembrance and honor to the nearly 3,000 people killed in the terror attacks of September 11, 2001 at the World Trade Center site, near Shanksville, Pa., and at the Pentagon, as well as the six people killed in the World Trade Center bombing in February 1993. The Memorial’s twin reflecting pools are each nearly an acre in size and feature the largest manmade waterfalls in the North America. The pools sit within the footprints where the Twin Towers once stood.

Architect Michael Arad and landscape architect Peter Walker created the Memorial design selected from a global design competition that included more than 5,200 entries from 63 nations. The names of every person who died in the 2001 and 1993 attacks are inscribed into bronze panels edging the Memorial pools, a powerful reminder of the largest loss of life resulting from a foreign attack on American soil and the greatest single loss of rescue personnel in American history.

The National September 11 Memorial (Animation)

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The Americans: A Brooklyn Summer, 1974

Danny Lyon: Turn of the Century Brownstone Apartments, Brooklyn, 1974

Danny Lyon: Life on Bond Street in Brooklyn, 1974

Danny Lyon: Boy Against Yellow Platform, Kosciusko Swimming Pool, Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn, 1974

Danny Lyon: Children at Reis Park, a Public Beach in Brooklyn, 1974

Danny Lyon: People Watch Boats on the East River, Manhattan Bridge and NYC in the Background, 1974

The Americans: A Brooklyn Summer, 1974

A Brooklyn Summer, 1974 is a beautiful collection of vintage photos of Brooklyn taken in the summer of 1974 by photographer Danny Lyon, and the vintage tone of these summertime photographs makes everything look so much hotter. Lyon spent two months snapping pictures of the daily life in the borough, exploring Bushwick, Bedford-Stuyvesant, Fort Green, Park Slope and other neighborhoods. Lyon captured the photographs of inner-city life while on assignment for Documerica, a project of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) that hired freelance photographers to capture images relating to environmental problems, EPA activities, and everyday life in the 1970s.

Born in 1942 in Brooklyn, Danny Lyon received a BA from the University of Chicago in 1973. In the 1960s and 1970s, Lyon made a name for himself covering life in Chicago’s impoverished Uptown neighborhood and the Southern Civil Rights movement. Lyon went on to give the world three incredible works: The Bikeriders, in which he chronicled his travels as a member of the Chicago Outlaws Motorcycle Club, The Destruction of Lower Manhattan, documenting the large-scale demolition of our country’s greatest city back in 1967, and Conversations with the Dead, in which he photographed and wrote about Texas inmates in 6 different prisons.

Lyon’s work has been frequently exhibited and collected; he is the recipient of a John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation Fellowship and National Endowment for the Arts grants in both film and photography.

You can read more about Danny Lyon’s work in The New York Times here.

The Museum of Photographic Arts: A Look at Danny Lyon

Photo-Gallery: A Brooklyn Summer, 1974

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