The Ironic Red Hot Downtown Booty Dance!

Photography by: Cyril Helnwein, Los Angeles

The Ironic Red Hot Downtown Booty Dance!

Downtown is a wonderful series of stunning black-and-white fine art nude photographs by Cyril Helnwein, shot guerrilla style at night on the streets of downtown LA, using only available ambient light from street signs and lamp posts. The photographs are accompanied by a video slide show of the images from the Downtown series. Booty Dance is a gleefully sexy one-minute short film, also by LA photographer Cyril Helnwein, comprised of behind-the-scenes footage of a model fooling around during a photo shoot. The unforgettable face was drawn on the model by the legendary comic artist Dan Panosian.

Mix it all together, and you’ve got the Ironic Red Hot Downtown Booty Dancer!

To view these photographs in best high-resolution quality, please go here.

Downtown: A Video Slide Show by Cyril Helnwein

The Ironic Red Hot Downtown Booty Dance!

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Nothing Personal: I’d Just Rather Be a Sexy Picture

Nothing Personal: I’d Just Rather Be a Sexy Picture

Nothing Personal is a six-minute short art film directed by the acclaimed photographer Matt Black for Black Palm Films, featuring Paz de la Huerta with original music by unkle. We’ve been seeing a goodly generous amount of Paz de la Huerta’s sexy body and bountiful boobs these past few months on Boardwalk Empire, not to mention her awkward wardrobe malfunction outside the LA’s Chateau Marmont. Now, exceeding both of those, Paz de la Huerta is seen inside the Chateau Marmont getting it on with some lucky actor in this steamy cinematic adventure. The first three minutes is all about Paz grinding it up, then the next basically explain the point of the film.

And just what is the point you may ask? The difference between making love and sex, that love provides a personal fulfillment that sex can’t accomplish. Sex is a very superficial way of appreciating people. And maybe even more to the point, narcissism is a very harsh friend.

Nothing Personal: I’d Just Rather Be a Sexy Picture

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Harvey Milk Day 2011: You’ve Got to Give Them Hope

Harvey Milk Day 2011: You’ve Got to Give Them Hope

Although California is presently the only state with an official Harvey Milk Day, cities all across the country will be holding rallies and events today to honor the first openly gay man to be elected to public office and an icon of the gay-rights movement. Milk, who would have been 81 years-old, gave us his life 32 years ago, knowing that the first of any civil rights movement, who clearly and loudly proclaim their right to equality, most often meets a violent and sudden end. Harvey Milk was elected to the San Francisco Board of Supervisors in 1977. He fought to end discrimination against gays and lesbians and built coalitions of gay-rights groups, labor unions and small-business owners. He was 48 when he was killed a year later by a former supervisor, Dan White.

The Times of Harvey Milk, a documentary film, won the 1984 Academy Award for Documentary Feature. The movie Milk, was released in 2008, directed by Gus Van Sant and starring Sean Penn as Milk and Josh Brolin as Dan White. Milk received two Academy Awards, for Best Original Screenplay and Best Actor. In August 2009, President Barack Obama posthumously awarded Harvey Milk the Presidential Medal of Freedom for his contribution to the gay rights movement stating, “He fought discrimination with visionary courage and conviction.”

Harvey Milk: The Candlelight Funeral Rites

A Documentary on Harvey Milk: 575 Castro St.

Harvey Milk: You’ve Got to Give Them Hope

Before there was the Academy Awards celebrated Milk, there was the widely acclaimed The Times of Harvey Milk, which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature Film in 1984, and was awarded The Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, among other awards. The documentary chronicles the political career of Harvey Milk, who was San Francisco’s first openly gay elected Board Supervisor. The film, at times humorous, at times nostalgic, and at other times quite tragic, tells the story of Harvey Milk’s rise to political power and emergence as a symbol of gay political achievement.

The Times of Harvey Milk documents through assembled historic film clips the tumultuous story of Milk’s grass-roots political organizing and election, through the shocking murders and their repercussions. It takes the film’s viewers along with the eloquent candle-light memorial joined by tens of thousands of San Franciscans on the evening of the assassinations, to the scenes of angry crowds who stormed San Francisco’s City Hall in the aftermath of the lenient sentence that Dan White received at his murder trial.

This Academy Award-winning documentary feature film depicts not only Harvey Milk himself, but also the political and social milieu of the era in which he lived. From this perspective, the film continues to have significant relevance for our nation today, standing as a classic portrait of communities and cultural values in severe conflict. The film was produced subsequent to Harvey Milk’s death using archival footage, so that Milk is credited posthumously as the lead actor. Other politicians, including San Francisco’s then-mayor George Moscone (who was assassinated along with Milk) and Moscone’s successor and now United States Senator Dianne Feinstein, also appear in the archival footage. Also featured in the film is then-schoolteacher Tom Ammiano, who has been a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors since 1994, and was elected to the California State Assembly. The film’s outstanding narration is provided by the acclaimed stage and screen actor Harvey Fierstein, who at that time had just achieved great success with his own Tony Award-winning Broadway play Torch Song Trilogy.

The Times of Harvey Milk: The Full Version of the Documentary

Slide Show:The Life and Times of Harvey Milk

(Please Click on Image Above to View Slide Show)

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Furry Fury: Carrot vs. Ninja

Furry Fury: Carrot vs. Ninja

Carrot vs. Ninja is a dark and quirky three-minute animated short film that’s an insane action romp inked and directed by Cedric Nicolas-Troyan, with character design and VFX by The Mill L.A. The hunter becomes the hunted in this short film with a surprising twist. It starts out innocently enough, as a guy drives his muscle car down a stretch of desert highway. Distracted by what might be road kill or its distant cousin, he pulls over to investigate and a ghoulish adventure ensues.

The film combines a clichéd cocky rock ‘n’ roll guy, a muscle car, a Western road movie setting and a darkly wacky Ninja element. While at first you think that you’ve seen it all before, as the story unfolds it gets progressively stranger and less predictable. Nothing is what it seems in Carrot vs. Ninja.

Furry Fury: Carrot vs. Ninja

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For Sock’s Sake: A Sock Absconds to a Sleazy Nightclub

For Sock’s Sake: A Sock Absconds to a Sleazy Nightclub

For Sock’s Sake is a very funny five-minute animated short film by Carlo Vogele, in which some clothes are taken off a clothesline and subjected to a range of cruel and harsh tortures. First, a sock falls from the clothesline and makes a mad dash for the nearby nightclub, suffering the fate of all wasters, philanderers and dilettantes who abscond in search of the nightlife’s bright lights and sleaze. Whether it be to rescue the sock or to similarly indulge, the line disgorges the rest of its clothes and a journey to the darkness and evils of an underworld clubland ensues. The film features graphic scenes of torture and licentiousness: a sleazy raincoat exposes his lining to the rescue party; Trousers, the boss man of the group, is badly-treated by a steam iron; and the poor little sock ends up being hung in chains above a vat of boiling bleach. This definitely is not a movie for the squeamish launderer!

For Sock’s Sake: A Sock Absconds to a Sleazy Nightclub

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Sermon on the Mound: Blessed are the Poor in Spirit

Sermon on the Mound: Blessed are the Poor in Spirit

Sermon on the Mound is an inspirational three-minute documentary short film directed by Eliot Rausch. The deeply personal documentary was shot over a period of 36 hours in Los Angeles and is  stunningly filmed and edited. The documentary short expresses a tone of unconditional love and support for the poor in spirit, the impoverished, the homeless and the persecuted. Previously, Rausch was the director of Last Minutes with Oden, which was named the Best Documentary and Overall Best Video at the 2010 Vimeo Awards in New York City.

Sermon on the Mound: Blessed are the Poor in Spirit

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The Poetics of Hope: A Wish for Peace in Our Time

Dove of Peace: Pablo Picasso, Lithograph (1949)

Playing For Change: Song Around the World-“Stand By Me”

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