Chicago’s 2013 Pride Parade: More Than 1 Million March for Marriage Equality

Chicago’s 2013 Pride Parade: More Than 1 Million March for Marriage Equality

Sunday’s Pride Parade on Chicago’s North Side, always a big festivity, fell at a time when the LGBT community is counting its victories in the fight to legalize same-sex marriage. On a perfect summer day, Chicago’s gay community celebrated the best way it knows: loudly, colorfully and with great flair. Thousands lined the streets of Uptown and Lakeview for the 44th annual Pride Parade, as it moved down Broadway and Halsted streets, a joyful revelry that took on new meaning in the wake of the Supreme Court’s decision to strike down the Defense of Marriage Act last week

In major victories for the human rights movement, the Supreme Court on Wednesday had ruled that married same-sex couples were entitled to federal benefits and, by declining to decide a case on Prop 8 from California, effectively allowed same-sex marriages there. By clearing the way for same-sex marriage in California, the nation’s most populous state, the court effectively increased to 13 the number of states that allow it.

Chicago’s 2013 Pride Parade: More Than 1 Million March for Marriage Equality

Chicago Pride Parade 2013

Macklemore & Ryan Lewis: Same Love

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The 2013 Gay Pride: Supreme Court’s Historic Rulings Support Gay Marriage

The 2013 Gay Pride: Supreme Court’s Historic Rulings Support Gay Marriage

In major victories for the human rights movement, the Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that married same-sex couples were entitled to federal benefits and, by declining to decide a case on Prop 8 from California, effectively allowed same-sex marriages there. By clearing the way for same-sex marriage in California, the nation’s most populous state, the court effectively increased to 13 the number of states that allow it.

In the hushed courtroom Wednesday morning, Justice Anthony M. Kennedy announced the majority opinion that struck down the federal law in a stately tone indicating he was delivering a civil rights landmark. The vote in the case striking down the federal Defense of Marriage Act was 5 to 4, and Justice Kennedy was joined by the four members of the court’s liberal wing. The ruling will immediately extend many benefits to couples married in the states that allow such unions, and it will allow the Obama administration to broaden other benefits through executive actions.

The case concerning California’s ban on same-sex marriage, enacted in a ballot initiative known as Proposition 8, was decided on technical grounds, with the majority saying that it was not properly before the court. Because officials in California had declined to appeal a trial court’s decision against them, and because the proponents of the ban were not entitled to step into the state’s shoes to appeal the decision, the court said, it was powerless to issue a decision. That left in place a trial court victory for two same-sex couples who had sought to marry.

Read more about the Supreme Court’s decisions in the New York Times here.

Read more about the Supreme Court’s Prop 8 decision in the Los Angeles Times here.

Supreme Court Bolsters Gay Marriage Rights

Supreme Court Rulings Spur Celebrations Among Gay Marriage Supporters

Gay Pride Month: Celebrating Loving Feelings for Others

It’s the Dream Afraid of Waking,
That Never Takes a Chance
.”

Harvey Milk: You’ve Got to Give Them Hope

Before there was this year’s Academy Awards celebrated Milk, there was the widely acclaimed The Times of Harvey Milk, which won the Academy Award for Best Documentary Feature Film in 1984, and was awarded The Special Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival, among other awards. The documentary chronicles the political career of Harvey Milk, who was San Francisco’s first openly gay elected Board Supervisor. The film, at times humorous, at times nostalgic, and at other times quite tragic, tells the story of Harvey Milk’s rise to political power and emergence as a symbol of gay political achievement.

The Times of Harvey Milk documents through assembled historic film clips the tumultuous story of Milk’s grass-roots political organizing and election, through the shocking murders and their repercussions. It takes the film’s viewers along with the eloquent candle-light memorial joined by tens of thousands of San Franciscans on the evening of the assassinations, to the scenes of angry crowds who stormed San Francisco’s City Hall in the aftermath of the lenient sentence that Dan White received at his murder trial.

This Academy Award-winning documentary feature film depicts not only Harvey Milk himself, but also the political and social milieu of the era in which he lived. From this perspective, the film continues to have significant relevance for our nation today, standing as a classic portrait of communities and cultural values in severe conflict. The film was produced subsequent to Harvey Milk’s death using archival footage, so that Milk is credited posthumously as the lead actor. Other politicians, including San Francisco’s then-mayor George Moscone (who was assassinated along with Milk) and Moscone’s successor and now United States Senator Dianne Feinstein, also appear in the archival footage. Also featured in the film is then-schoolteacher Tom Ammiano, who has been a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors since 1994, and was elected to the California State Assembly. The film’s outstanding narration is provided by the acclaimed stage and screen actor Harvey Fierstein, who at that time had just achieved great success with his own Tony Award-winning Broadway play Torch Song Trilogy.

The Times of Harvey Milk: The Full Version of the Documentary

Slide Show:The Life and Times of Harvey Milk

(Please Click on Image Above to View Slide Show)

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Mayor Rahm Emanuel Leads Chicago’s 42nd Annual Gay Pride Parade

Mayor Rahm Emanuel Leads Chicago’s 42nd Annual Gay Pride Parade

The 42nd Annual Chicago Gay Pride Parade kicked off from the northside Lakeview neighborhood at noon on Sunday, led by Chicago’s new mayor, Rahm Emanuel. It was the first time in a long time that a sitting mayor has appeared in the parade, a salute to the lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community. An animated Rahm Emanuel marched directly behind the parade’s lead banner and platoon of police on horseback. Dressed casually in a light blue shirt, white jeans, tennis shoes and black shades, Emanuel brought the crowd to a roar as he stopped to high-five a little girl and hoisted a young boy over the metal barricade for a peck on the cheek.

Emanuel is a regular at the parade, having appeared at the festivities almost every year while he served in Congress. He has been a relentless advocate of gay causes, including HIV/AIDS funding, civil unions and gay marriage. Joining him in the parade was Governor Pat Quinn, who recently signed the Illinois civil union legislation, as Illinois became the sixth state to allow civil unions or their equivalent, giving same-sex couples the same state-level rights that come with marriage.

The parade usually draws around a half-million celebrants, but coming right on the heels of winning the long-sought right for same-sex couples to enter into civil unions and the historic passage of the New York bill allowing same sex marriage Friday night, this parade swelled to an estimated attendance of 750,000, which was likely a record number of rainbow-clad spectators.

Viewers can read a short history of the gay rights movement in Illinois here.

Mayor Rahm Emanuel Leads The 42nd Annual Chicago Gay Pride Parade

Chicago’s 2010 Gay Pride Parade

The Chicago Gay Pride Parade Celebration

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Be Proud: The 2010 Chicago Gay Pride Parade

Be Proud: The 2010 Chicago Gay Pride Parade

An eclectic mix of stars, The Stanley Cup with Blackhawks defenseman Brent Sopel, the Chicago Cubs’ Ernie Banks, country singer Chely Wright and Illinois Governor Pat Quinn basked in the celebration of an estimated 500,000 people who attended the 41st Annual Pride Parade in Chicago’s North-Side Lakeview neighborhood.  Sopel, who stood on the Chicago Gay Hockey Association’s colorful float, said that he was participating in the parade to honor the memory of his former general manager’s gay son.

Spectators and the half-million parade participants alike provided a deafening roar of welcome to the Stanley Cup and ex-Blackhawks defenseman Brent Sopel as the Chicago Gay Pride Parade kicked off promptly at noon on Sunday.  Led by Grand Marshal country music sensation Chely Wright, the parade proceeded without any difficulties or delays.

The close to five hundred thousand revelers lined the streets of Halsted and Broadway on the hot, humid June afternoon.  A mixture of sun and clouds was welcome, following the heavy morning thunderstorms that threatened to dampen the event.  Illinois gay Congressman Mike Quigley stated: “When a professional hockey organization like the Blackhawks joins in our celebration of gay pride, that really opens doors.  The barriers are down.”

In addition to the Stanley Cup, the Chicago Cubs also had a float in the parade with All-Star Ernie Banks representing the Cubs.  Laura Ricketts, one of the new owners of the Cubs, is a lesbian.  “The unique thing about this parade is that finally, the Chicago Cubs are here, the Blackhawks are here.  Not that we really need recognition of that kind, but the fact of having major league sports teams joining our parade is a great thing,” Chicago’s openly gay Alderman Tom Tunney said.  “That’s probably the unique difference about today.”

State Representative Greg Harris (D-IL) echoed the comment about the Cubs and Blackhawks, saying  “This time next year I hope to be celebrating marriage equality in Illinois.”  Politicians by the dozens walked and rode in the parade.  Over 300 floats and marching groups made up the three hours long trail, which started at Halsted and Belmont and ended at Diversey and Broadway.

Chicago’s 2010  Gay Pride Parade

[vimeo http://vimeo.com/13052461 w=700&h=400]

The Chicago Gay Pride Parade Celebration

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