Photos of the Day: Train of Thought

Photos of the Day: Train of Thought

Photography by: Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

Train of Thought

Animated Short Film by: Jeff Scher

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Disappearing Storefronts: The Edifice Complex and the City’s Changing Face

Disappearing Storefronts: The Edifice Complex and the City’s Changing Face

New York’s neighborhood storefronts have long had the city’s history carved into their unusual, distinct facades. Each of these little stores is as unique as the neighborhood residents that they serve and are run by shopkeepers committed to providing a special service. Many of these shops have long served as essential parts of their communities, vital to the residents who depend on them for a multitude of everyday needs. But the storefront shops are quickly disappearing, as their neighborhoods are transformed by both rapid gentrification and quickly escalating rents in the real estate market.

The dwindling number of these commercial relics in the city’s rapidly changing streets range from tiny, humble “mom and pop” neighborhood stores tucked away on narrow side streets to well-known institutions on historic streets. The photographs of the city’s disappearing storefronts shown here provide a view of the rapid social and economic changes that are threatening the life of unique enterprises that have long made the city’s neighborhoods distinctive.

From photographs and text by James and Karla Murray.

Disappearing Storefronts: The Edifice Complex and the City’s Changing Face

(Please Click on the Image Above to View Photo-Gallery)

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Photo of the Day: Feet-Red-Future-Unease

Photo of the Day: Feet-Red-Future-Unease

Photography by: Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

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Death to the Tinman: How the Tinman Became a Metal-Man Without a Heart

Death to the Tinman: How the Tinman Became a Metal-Man Without a Heart

Death to the Tinman premiered at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival, where it received an Honorable Mention for Best Short Film. In addition, Death to the Tinman won the Best Short Film Award at the 2007 Savannah Film Festival; the film has also played at the South by Southwest Film Festival and the New York Film Festival, among others. The film’s Director is Ray Tintori, a 26-year-old filmmaker from Brooklyn (NY), who also directs music videos for various music groups, such as MGMT. Tintori is a member of the Court 13 film collective, which is an acclaimed ensemble group of collaborative filmmakers and performers. The Court 13 collective is renowned for its multi-award winning short film Glory at Sea, a film that was set in Post-Katrina New Orleans. Glory at Sea’s mythic narrative surged from the depths of an epic senseless human tragedy to a doggedly determined communal passion to achieve a transmuting sense of resurrection and deliverance from Katrina’s catastrophic devastation. Glory at Sea valiantly confronted a monumental tragedy that vividly displayed the fact of our human mortality, as well as the inevitable loss of our dreams for the future. The film boldly turned away from the Post-Katrina survivors’ overwhelming of feelings of vulnerability, following the group of survivors as they instead came to courageously respond with a communal bond to a renewed and feverish commitment to love and hope.

Similarly, the mythical Death to the Tinman presents a visual narrative that swells from the unfathomable depths of human tragedy, to an achievement of the renewed capacity for a sense of love and hope. Describing Death to the Tinman, Tintori said, “I wasn’t terribly interested in trying to recreate Oz from the 1930s movies; I just sort of wanted to deal with this world of evangelical mysticism.” Death to the Tinman is an adaptation of the original story of the Tin Man from the Wizard of Oz series, in which Tintori’s version of the Tin Man is transformed from a human lumberjack to a metal man without a heart. Tintori transported the story’s basic foundation for the original Tin Man story to a surreal, rural 1940s South, replacing Oz magic with evangelical mysticism; pastors, congregations and The Rapture take the place of flying monkeys and witches melting upon contact with water.

Assuredly, rigorous formalism is existent, albeit uncommon among professional American filmmakers today; in addition, films that display an audacious, frenzied love of the medium are equally infrequent. To see all of these factors displayed side-by-side in the same work is profoundly rare, and Death to the Tinman just happens to be one of those epic film creations. Watching Ray Tintori’s Death to the Tinman for the first time, one can feel somewhat shocked by the experience of realizing that what you’re watching is a remarkable breakthrough short film. Tintori’s modern transformation of the original story about how the Tinman came to be the Tinman was created in a way that conveys an underlying emotional tone that progresses from the chaotic, to the quirky, to the profoundly poignant.

If you haven’t seen any of Ray Tintori’s works yet, I would highly recommend that you take twelve-minutes to watch Death to the Tinman. It’s truly a small investment to make in return for a rare, sizable emotional profit.

Death to the Tinman: How the Tinman Became a Metal-Man With No Heart

Photo-Gallery: Death to the Tinman/How the Tinman Became a Metal-Man Without a Heart

(Please Click on Above Image to View Photo-Gallery)

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Polaroid Love: Love Lost and Redeemed Through the Lens of a Polaroid Camera

Polaroid Love: Love Lost and Redeemed Through the Lens of a Polaroid Camera

Well I stumbled in the darkness
I’m lost and alone
Though I said I’d go before us
And show the way back home
There a light up ahead
I can’t hold onto her arm
Forgive me pretty baby
But I always take the long way home

Tom Waits

Polaroid Love (2008) is a half-hour long short film from Russia that already has won three awards at the 2008 28th Annual International Moscow Film School (VGIK) Film Festival. The short film won awards for the Best Actor, Best Editing and Best Production. Polaroid Love is a quiet, very introspective drama expressed in a quite unusual way; the film’s story can evoke from viewers a multitude of personal ideas and nostalgic thoughts.

Polaroid Love is a narrative about an unusual romance: It tells a bittersweet story about how a consuming passion for a Polaroid camera played the central role in being in love, losing that love and (I think) the love being unexpectedly regained. More generally, Polaroid Love might suggest that the world seems to be more beautiful when viewed while listening to your favorite music, or seen through the eyes of the one you love, or maybe even captured through the lens of a Polaroid camera.

Polaroid Love: Love Lost and Redeemed Through the Lens of a Polaroid Camera

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Photo of the Day: Radio-City-Corridor-Serenity

Photo of the Day: Radio-City-Corridor-Serenity

Photography by: Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

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Dogged Fameball Ego-Blobber Julia Allison Airs on Most Obscure TV Channel Ever!

Dogged Fameball Ego-Blobber Julia Allison Airs on Most Obscure TV Channel Ever!

Gawker reports that the never-ending ego-blobber Julia Allison has just informed them of some amazing, breaking world news: Her videoblog, TMIweekly, has been picked up by NBC’s New York Nonstop. Now, this turns out to be highly appropriate, because New York Nonstop is certainly as close as it gets to the edge of internet obscurity, while still letting one claim to be on television. This makes it quite a suitable perch for the vapid, irrelevant musings of Allison, an inappropriately well-known dating columnist for Time Out New York, and her two cohorts, Silicon Valley heiress Meghan Asha Parikh and vapid handbag designer Mary Rambin. The episodes of TMIweekly, Allison’s videoblog, have featured the goofy trio blathering on and on about totally uninteresting aspects of their lives (just imagine very bad Twittering, only videotaped).

It’s all part of their faux-business called NonSociety. Allison recently reported that NonSociety had taken in revenues of $60,000 during all of 2008. Calculating with an advanced business metric known as earnings before expenses, that would give NonSociety’s three pseudo-socialite Foundresses a living-level that’s just slightly above minimum wage. Now, whatever NBC is paying Allison for her 24×7 filler, it’s certainly too much, as NBC’s own officials seem to realize! Meredith McGinn, Senior Manager of Special Products for NBC4, explained to the New York Daily News: “You’ll get your meat, your news, weather and headlines-every 15 minutes. In between those 15 minutes, you may have a two-minute segment, a two-minute pod, a five-minute pod. So the shows we’re looking at are in little bits, not your traditional half-hour newscasts.”

So the news is the meat, which makes TMIweekly what, exactly? Shredded lettuce? Mayo? Anything, surely, except relish. So rather than force-feed you to watch even one awful episode of Julia Allison’s TMIweekly, here’s Gawker videographer Richard Blakeley’s much funnier parody-spoof, Welcome to NomSociety:

Julia Allison and Cohorts: Welcome To NomSociety

Thanks to Gawker.

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