Eve Arnold, Legendary Photographer of Illuminating Images, Dies at 99

All About Eve: The Photography of Eve Arnold

Eve Arnold, who came to be regarded as a grande dame of postwar photojournalism for her bold, revealing images of subjects as diverse as Marilyn Monroe and migratory potato pickers, died on Wednesday in London at the age of 99. Born in Philadelphia on April 21, 1912, Ms. Arnold had lived in Great Britain since 1961.

Her death was announced by Magnum Photos, the photography cooperative to which she had belonged for more than a half-century. She was among the first women Magnum hired to make pictures. Ms. Arnold was a leading light in what is considered to be the golden age of news photography, when magazines like Life and Look commanded attention with big, arresting pictures provided by photographers who included Henri Cartier-Bresson, Gordon Parks, Robert Capa and Margaret Bourke-White.

Acclaimed for capturing celebrities in intimate moments after winning their trust, Ms. Arnold developed a particular rapport with Marilyn Monroe, the subject of a book of Arnold photographs. Foreshadowing the celebrity portfolios of photographers like Annie Leibovitz, Ms. Arnold captured Joan Crawford squirming into a girdle, Malcolm X collecting fistfuls of dollars at a rally in Washington and James Cagney and his wife doing an impromptu dance in a barn.

But other pictures, just as memorable, were of the unfamous. Among the more than 750,000 Ms. Arnold made were pictures in a South African shantytown, a Havana brothel and a Moscow psychiatric hospital. She documented a small Long Island town, Miller Place, and the first minutes of a baby’s life. She was an official photographer on 40 movie sets.

Her many honors include the Order of the British Empire and the Lifetime Achievement Award of the American Society of Magazine Photographers. She was a Fellow of the Royal Photographic Society and named a “Master Photographer” by the International Center of Photography in New York, considered by many to be the world’s most prestigious photographic honor.

You can read more about Eve Arnold’s life and work in The New York Times here.

View a slide show of Eve Arnold’s photography here.

All About Eve: The Photography of Eve Arnold

Eve Arnold: Lifetime Achievement Award, The 2010 Sony World Photography Awards

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Andy Warhol and Friends: On Set and Back Home

Andy Warhol and Friends: On Set and Back Home

Andy Warhol and Friends

Andy Warhol and Friends is a new collection of photographs of Andy Warhol and his circle of friends.  In this extensive set of photographs, Warhol and his film crew shoot the 1968 Lonesome Cowboys movie in the hot Arizona desert, and other images capture Andy and his sidekicks posing and generally acting very “artsy-campy” well into the 1980s.

“Warhol’s Cinema” from The Factory: 1963-1968

Warhol’s Cinema is a 1989 BBC-TV Channel 4 documentary about a number of films made Andy Warhol in the 1960s.  During the five year span of his obsession with films, Warhol made more than 50 films between 1963-1968.  Most of his movies were 16-millimeter films and included Chelsea Girls, Empire, Sleep, Kiss, My Hustler and Lonesome Cowboys.  He made many of the films in his mid-town studio, known as The Factory, where the young people in his offbeat cortège, alternately beautiful and bizarre, spent much or most of their time.  That group of followers included, among many others, Baby Jane Holzer, Gerard Malanga, Paul America, Holly Woodlawn, Joe Dellasandro, Chuck Weir and Edie Sedgwick.

Andy Warhol’s Cinema: A Mirror to the Sixties

Andy Warhol: A PBS American Masters Documentary (2006)

Slide Show: Andy Warhol and Friends/On Set and Back Home

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Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Perfect Moment

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Perfect Moment

Henri Cartier-Bresson was a photographer who, some critics have said, was a bundle of contradictions. He was interested both in photographic realism, in the world as it was, as well as in the hidden depths of the unconscious that the camera might reveal, in the search for mystery.  This article presents a number of vintage photographs, a slide show and a documentary short about his early masterpieces, entitled The Perfect Moment.

Henri Cartier-Bresson: The Perfect Moment

Slide Show: Henri Cartier-Bresson/The Perfect Moment

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Kent State: The Day the War Came Home

Kent State: The Day the War Came Home

Bullets don’t like people
who love flowers,
They’re jealous ladies, bullets,
short on kindness.
Allison Krause, nineteen years old,
you’re dead
for loving flowers.

May 4th, 2010, will mark the 40th Anniversary of the Kent State Shootings, also known as the Kent State Massacre, which took place at Kent State University in Ohio.  It involved the shooting of unarmed college students by members of the Ohio National Guard on Monday, May 4, 1970.  The guardsmen fired 67 rounds over a period of 13 seconds, killing four students and wounding nine others.

Some of the students who were shot had been protesting against the American invasion of Cambodia, which President Richard Nixon had announced in a television address on April 30.  Other students who were shot had been walking nearby or observing the protest from a distance.  There was a significant nation-wide response to the shootings: hundreds of universities, colleges, and high schools closed throughout the United States resulting from a student strike of four million students.

Remembering The Kent State Massacre May 4, 1970

Slide Show: Kent State/The Day the War Came Home

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Annie Leibovitz and Mikhail Baryshnikov: One Moment, Two Stars

Annie Leibovitz and Mikhail Baryshnikov: One Moment, Two Stars

After shooting Louis Vuitton advertisement campaigns for the last three years, Annie Leibovitz got in front of the lens, with dancer and choreographer Mikhail Baryshnikov, for Vuitton’s newest campaign in the Core Values series.  The series has previously featured legends such as Sean Connery, Mikhail Gorbachev, Keith Richards, Buzz Aldrin, Roman and Sofia Coppola, and Catherine Deneuve.  The longtime friends posed in Leibovitz’s New York City studio, where the subtle lighting captured a tender moment between the two old friends.

Annie Leibovitz and Mikhail Baryshnikov: There’s This One Funny Picture….

Annie Leibovitz: I Really Wanted to Understand a Dancer

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Dock Ellis: A Heavenly Flamboyant Psychedelic Comeback!

Dock Ellis: A Heavenly Flamboyant Psychedelic Comeback!

The Sundance Film Festival has announced its 2010 Jury Prizes, and James Blagden’s Dock Ellis and the LSD No-No was awarded an Honorable Mention in Short Filmmaking.  Blagden created an animated short film that tells a hilarious, meandering story about the former major league pitcher Dock Ellis, which leads him to one of his greatest moments in the sport.  It provides a  magical narration of his infamous no-hitter for the Pittsburgh Pirates against the San Diego Padres in 1970 while he was “high as a Georgia pie,” or specifically under the influence of LSD.  After retiring, he later worked as a drug counselor before passing away last December.

Dock Ellis: A Heavenly Flamboyant Psychedelic Comeback!

Dock Ellis: A First-Person Account of His Infamous No-Hitter

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Andy Warhol’s Cinema: A Mirror to the Sixties

Andy Warhol’s Cinema: A Mirror to the Sixties

“Warhol’s Cinema” from The Factory: 1963-1968

Warhol’s Cinema is a 1989 BBC-TV Channel 4 documentary about a number of films made Andy Warhol in the 1960s. During the five year span of his obsession with films, Warhol made more than 50 films between 1963-1968. Most of his movies were 16-millimeter films and included Chelsea Girls, Empire, Sleep, Kiss, My Hustler and Lonesome Cowboys. He made many of the films in his mid-town studio, known as The Factory, where the young people in his offbeat cortège, alternately beautiful and bizarre, spent much or most of their time. That group of followers included, among many others, Baby Jane Holzer, Gerard Malanga, Paul America, Holly Woodlawn, Joe Dellasandro, Chuck Weir and Edie Sedgwick.

Warhol’s Shiny Silver Tin-Foil Factory

Andy Warhol’s original Factory was often thought of as the Silver Factory by the people who came to derive a sense of attachment from being involved in or even just hanging around the sense of creative excitement that was evolving there. This was amplified by the national social (and political) landscape at that time, where fragmentation was gaining increasing momentum. The sense of excitement around the Factory derived, to a large degree, from an energized feeling that it was possible to openly embrace a range of experiences that had previously been socially forbidden.

In this way, the shiny, shimmering silver represented the decadence of the scene, as well as the “proto-glam” of the early sixties. Silver, fractured mirrors and tin foil were the basic decorating materials loved by the early amphetamine users of the sixties. By combining the industrial structure of his unfurnished Factory art studio with the glitter of silver and what it represented, Warhol was commenting on American values, as he did so often in his art. The years spent at the Factory were known as the Silver Era, not solely because of its design, but also because of the decadent and carefree lifestyle full of money, parties, drugs and fame.

The Factory became a meeting place for a large number of artists and musicians such as Lou Reed, Bob Dylan, Brian Jones, Truman Capote, Robert Mapplethorpe, Patti Smith, William Burroughs, Baby Jane Holzer, Anita Pallenberg, Philip Johnson and Mick Jagger. Other, less frequent visitors included Salvador Dalí, Tennessee Williams and Allen Ginsberg. At the same time, Warhol collaborated with Lou Reed’s influential New York rock band, The Velvet Underground, and in 1965 he designed the famous cover for The Velvet Underground & Nico, the band’s debut album. Paradoxically, however, no matter how rose-colored the glasses, the silvery glitter was after all only tawdry tin foil. In this sense, Warhol had built a sham to reflect the broader social sham that he claimed to be rejecting. Unfortunately, many members of his Factory entourage took the sham for real and paid dearly for it in or with their lives.

Andy Warhol’s Cinema: A Mirror to the Sixties

“Andy Warhol’s Cinema” from The Factory: 1963-1968

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