Michelangelo: The Drawings of a Genius

Adam, The Creation of Man (1511-12)

Study of an Inclined Head and Detailed Eye Study (1529/30)

The Risen Christ (ca. 1532)

Madonna and Child (1520-1525)

Michelangelo: The Drawings of a Genius

Michelangelo: The Drawings of a Genius presents a selection of pictures from a major exhibition of around one hundred of the most beautiful drawings by Michelangelo currently at the Albertina in Vienna, Austria.  This is the first major Michelangelo exhibition in more than twenty years, with a focus on the figural drawings by Michelangelo, who is introduced here as the genius of a period of change.

Michelangelo: The Drawings of a Genius

Slide Show: Michelangelo/The Drawings of a Genius

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That Sticky Candy: Subverting Conventional Stereotypes of Gay Identity

Shadow Play

O Pioneers

Nature versus Industry

That Sticky Candy: Subverting Conventional Stereotypes of Gay Identity

Figurative Art by:  Scott Hunt, NYC

That Sticky Candy is a series of figurative art pieces by Scott Hunt, an artist whose work has been exhibited internationally and whose art is part of the permanent collection of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.  These charcoal and pastel drawings take their inspiration from 1940s and 50s photography; they present and subvert conventional perceptions of gay identity.  Hunt tackles the theme of homosexuality without the demure or closeted strategies often associated with gay subject matter in art.  In doing so, one discovers that his direct approach to homosexuality and gay male sexuality in visual art is, in a way, surreal as well.

For Hunt, the title of this series refers to a metaphor that speaks about how something that one might crave and be pleasured by can become messy and constricting.  In particular, gay men have been yoked to the  idea that they are hypersexual beings, and in this work Hunt attempts to point out how limiting that is, that a gay identity is infinitely more complex and broad than that.

A Slide Show: That Sticky Candy/Subverting Conventional Stereotypes of Gay Identity

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The Art of Mysterious Old American Snapshots

Nature versus Industry

And Red All Over

Death and the Maiden: Musical Interlude

The Art of Mysterious Old American Snapshots

Figurative Artwork by:  Scott Hunt, NYC

Scott Hunt is a figurative artist whose discipline is drawing (charcoal and pastel on paper); he has shown internationally, and his work is part of the permanent collection of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.  Hunt’s drawings have a droll, subtly wry quality and take their inspiration from mysterious, uncomfortable, hilarious and sad moments in 1940s and 50s amateur photography, conferring upon them a new sense of life.

Hunt describes other people’s snapshots as “little mysteries; they have a history that’s lost and that can’t be accessed.  That severed link to the past fascinates me and gives me a vague sense of anxiety that compels me to create my own stories about who these people were, what brought them to this particular moment in time, and what preceded and followed the snap of the shutter.”

Slide Show: The Art of Mysterious Old American Snapshots

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A Beautiful Mind: Stephen Wiltshire Draws New York City from Memory

A Beautiful Mind: Stephen Wiltshire Draws New York City from Memory

Steven Wiltshire (born 1974) is an accomplished architectural artist who has been diagnosed with an autistic spectrum disorder.  Wiltshire’s work has been the subject of many television documentaries; neurologist Oliver Sacks praised his artistic work in the chapter Prodigies in his book An Anthropologist on Mars.  Stephen Wiltshire’s many published art books have included Cities (1989), Floating Cities (1991) and Stephen Wiltshire’s American Dream (1993).

Wiltshire is presently working to complete his last drawing in a series of city panoramas, this time of his spiritual home, New York City.  Wiltshire’s collection of  already completed works depicting some of the world’s most iconic cities already includes London, Tokyo, Hong Kong, Rome, Madrid, Frankfurt, Dubai, and Jerusalem.  A 20-minute fly-over Manhattan this past weekend provided the memory for a 20-foot panorama of the city that he’s drawing throughout this week at Brooklyn’s Pratt Institute.  Viewers can watch his progress on a live web cam or visit the Institute while he works from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Monday, Oct. 26 to Friday, Oct. 30, 2009.

A Beautiful Mind: Stephen Wiltshire Draws New York City from Memory

Slide Show: A Beautiful Mind/Stephen Wiltshire Draws New York City from Memory

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Viewers can watch his progress on a live web cam while he works from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. from Monday, Oct. 26 to Friday, Oct. 30, here.

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My Articles for Wednesday, September 26, 2007

Today marks the start of the infamous 1969-70 Chicago Seven Trial of activists charged with plotting to incite riots at the 1968 Chicago DNC. That DNC attracted Vietnam War protesters and civil rights activists. They were faced and attacked by Mayor Richard Daley’s brutal police force.

Drawings, photographs and a video photo-gallery are included.

[tags: The 1968 Chicago Democratic National Convention, 1968 DNC, Chicago, Chicago Seven Trial, politics, Mayor Richard Daley, photographs]

In this week’s “Dancing With the Stars,” the most vivid moment on “Boys’ Night” was when the camera showed the faces of the women competitors after model Albert Reed completed a cha-cha-cha. With so many pelvic gyrations, he could easily get a gig as a Chippendale stripper. The women were absolutely agog! The article includes photographs and video.

[tags: Dancing with the Stars, Albert Reed, hunk, sexy, photographs, gay, YouTube]

“Photo of the Day: Sleeping Beauty.” Every beauty needs a bit of shut-eye, a little beauty rest! This is a stunning, beautiful photograph that is presented for you here in high-resolution.

[tags: Photo of the Day, Photograph of the Day, Sleeping Beauty, photograph, photography, sexy, gay]

Wofford College, the smallest school in Division I football, beat Division I-AA’s top-ranked Appalachian State by a score of 42-31. Fans recall last year’s University of South Carolina game, where Wofford lost a close 27-20 game in the final 5-seconds. This article gives a historic look at this unusual, small college. Photographs and videos are included.

[tags: Wofford College, Wofford beat Appalachian State, sports, football, college football, videos, photographs]

See the Rest of My Articles at Blue Dot

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Pictures of the Day: The 1969-70 Chicago Seven Conspiracy Trial

Abbie Hoffman Reading a Book During the Trial

Abbie Hoffman Wearing Judicial Robes at the Trial


Poet Allen Ginsberg Testifying at the Trial

Bobby Seale Bound and Gagged in Court

Mayor Daley Testifying at the Trial

Yippie founder Abbie Hoffman is shown sporting judicial robes and reading in court. Another drawing, shaded in murky brown, depicts a celebrity poet Allen Ginsberg testifying in Sanskrit. These images are among 483 courtroom sketches from the 1969-70 Chicago Seven conspiracy trial recently acquired by the Chicago History Museum.  The pictures, the work of famed news artist Franklin McMahon, tell the story of one of the more bizarre spectacles in U.S. courtroom history, a trial that reflected the divergence of the youth counterculture of the 1960s from previous generations.

According to a report by Azam Ahmed in The Chicago Tribune:

The historical significance is that it’s one of the first places in a formal setting that you see just how different young people’s views were from the generation that they saw themselves up against,” said Joy Bivins, a curator at the museum. “That these really critical issues of the Vietnam War, youth counterculture and civil rights all come together in one place is unique.

The drawings, once sorted, will be exhibited at the museum, where McMahon’s drawings from the Emmett Till trial already grace the walls.  His Chicago Seven sketches, drawn in shades of black, brown and deep auburn, provide snapshots of a supremely colorful trial in which the defendants wore jeans, ate, editorialized out loud and slept during the court proceedings.

The judge was uptight, and these guys were running revolution by show business,” McMahon said.  “They were out there to make a scene, and they did.”

The trial began Sept. 24, 1969, 13 months after violence broke out during the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago, shocking the nation.  Protesters collected in Grant Park were clubbed and gassed; one observer described the police force as hitting the crowd like “sheets of rain.”

The government charged eight men with conspiring to incite a riot.   The number originally included Bobby Seale, leader of the Black Panthers, who was bound and gagged in court because of insults he hurled at Judge Julius Hoffman.   Seale eventually was severed from the case and sentenced to 4 years in prison for contempt of court.

That left seven defendants: Abbie Hoffman, Jerry Rubin, David Dellinger, Rennie Davis, Tom Hayden, John Froines and Lee Weiner.  Their trial became a microcosm of the tensions playing out throughout the nation during the 1960s.

McMahon, 86, who has drawn everything from the protests in Selma, Ala., to the Paris Opera, said the trial was among the most important of his subjects during that time.

I thought the acts of the defendants were atrocious, but I was on their side in the sense I was against the war and in the sense I was more of a Democrat than a Republican,” McMahon said.

The work of McMahon, a longtime freelancer, has appeared in the Tribune, The Washington Post, The New York Times, Fortune, Life and Sports Illustrated, among other publications.  In addition to covering the trial of the men accused of killing Till, a 14-year-old Chicago boy, McMahon drew pictures in Mission Control for the first landing on the moon.”

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Stephen Wiltshire: A Marvelous Gift

Stephen Wiltshire: A Marvelous Gift

Stephen Wiltshire: Architectural Drawing

Yesterday, I was thinking of an adolescent young man (diagnosed with Aspergers Syndrome) with whom I work and about how richly human and brilliant he is.  At the same time, I reminisced about how reciprocally warm and affectionate our relationship has been during the time we have known each other.

Later that night, thoughts about Steven Wiltshire (born 1974) came to mind.  Wiltshire is an accomplished architectural artist who has been diagnosed with an autistic spectrum disorder.  Wiltshire’s work has been the subject of many television documentaries; neurologist Oliver Sacks praised his artistic work in the chapter ‘Prodigies” in his book “An Anthropologist on Mars.

Stephen Wiltshire’s published art books have included “Cities” (1989), “Floating Cities” (1991) and “Stephen Wiltshire’s American Dream” (1993).

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