He Dies At The End: Terrifying Death by the Horrible Unknown!

He Dies At The End: Terrifying Death by the Horrible Unknown!

He Dies At The End is an award-winning, excruciatingly suspenseful 4-minute minimalist horror film by the Irish filmmaker Damien McCarthy.  Sitting all alone in his office, a man takes an online quiz which promises to tell him how he will die.  Will he suffer a terrible death tied up, cut up, at the hands of evil hosts, demons, monsters or the devil?  And sitting there in his darkened office, is he really alone?

He Dies At The End: Terrifying Death by the Horrible Unknown!

(Please View in in HD Full-Screen Mode for Total Terror-Experience)

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The Cinematic Orchestra: To Build a Home

To Build a Home is a beautiful, sedate 12-minute short film that was created by The Cinematic Orchestra.  The film combines remarkable cinematography with an emotionally harrowing story line.  It’s accompanied by elegantly moving music, which is at the same time hauntingly sad and melancholy.  To Build a Home centers upon the  narrative theme of love and loss.  It chronicles the final hours of a dying woman with her devoted, loving husband in their simple stone cottage in the dramatic Cumbrian countryside of northern England.

The Cinematic Orchestra: To Build a Home

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No Time: Seeing Life Through the Lens of Death

No Time: Seeing Life Through the Lens of Death

No Time

In a rush this weekday morning,
I tap the horn as I speed past the cemetery
where my parents are buried
side by side under a smooth slab of granite.

Then, all day long, I think of him rising up
to give me that look
of knowing disapproval
while my mother calmly tells him to lie back down.

Billy Collins

U. S. Poet Laureate, 2001-2003

Seeing Life Through the Lens of Death

During an interview focusing upon our perceptions of the dead, Collins touched upon his portrayal of death in the poem No Time:

“The underlying theme of Western poetry is mortality. The theme of carpe diem asks us to seize the day because we have only a limited number of them. To see life through the lens of death is to approach the condition of gratitude for the gift, or simply the fact, of our existence. And as Wallace Stevens said, Death is the mother of beauty. Only the perishable can be beautiful, which is why we are unmoved by artificial flowers….

We visit graves because they give the illusion that the person is somewhere, in some place. But like a mandala, the gravestoneitself is a focusing device. The treatment of the dead as if they were still alive is ancient. The Egyptians would entomb you with your favorite food, flowers, even pets (poor dears). In that way, maybe we are all in some form of hopeful denial.”

No Time: Seeing Life Through the Lens of Death

Animation by: Jeff Scher

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Randy Pausch Visits Oprah: A Lecture on Living

Update: Please read my eulogy of Professor Randy Pausch, which includes additional photographs, videos and an extensive photo-gallery here.

Randy Pausch Visits Oprah Winfrey: A Lecture on Living

Randy Pausch didn’t want his last lecture at Carnegie Mellon University to be about dying, but he is, sadly, dying of pancreatic cancer.   He knows it’s a painful way to go.  When he gave his final lecture last month, he wanted to demonstrate that his focus remains, as always, on living, or on living in the process of dying.  Today, he appeared on The Oprah Winfrey Show, and this is what he had to say:

Randy Pausch Visits Oprah Winfrey: No Self-Pity

When there’s an elephant in the room introduce him.”

Randy Pausch Visits Oprah Winfrey: No Self-Pity

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At Death’s Door: Randy Pausch Gives His Final Lecture on The Process of Dying

At Death’s Door: Living in the Process of Dying

Randy Pausch didn’t want his last lecture to be about dying. But he is, sadly, dying of pancreatic cancer, and he knows that it’s a painful way to die. Nevertheless, when he walked up to the podium last month to address more than 450 colleagues, students, and friends at Carnegie Mellon University, he intended to demonstrate that his focus remains, as it always has been, on living. So he did a couple of one-handed push-ups, sprinkled his remarks with jokes, donned props including a Mad Hatter hat, and generally showed that one way to cheat death is to laugh in its face.

Mr. Pausch is a 46-year-old professor of computer science and the co-founder of Carnegie-Mellon’s Entertainment Technology Center. He agreed to give the talk in part so that his three young children, ages 5, 2, and 1, could one day hear his message, on “Really Achieving Your Childhood Dreams. Sure, he could have just delivered the advice in front of a video camera at home, and he thought about taking that route, but he felt that an audience would lend his message greater weight. “A couple of hundred people in a room, looking and listening and laughing and applauding, hopefully at the appropriate times, that gives a lot of validation to my kids that a lot of people believe in this, and a lot of people who knew me believe that I did my best to try to live this way,” he said in an interview on Tuesday.

Professor Pausch said that it was the most difficult talk he ever wrote, and he’s known to be a creative speaker. The lecture, or drama, is told in three acts. Act I: Mr. Pausch’s childhood dreams, and how he managed to achieve a number of big ones, like designing rides for Disney World and taking a trip in zero gravity. Act II: How to enable the dreams of others, a section peppered with self-deprecating stories of how his mentors steered him from arrogance to becoming a mentor himself. Act III: How to achieve your dreams and help others, in which he entreats parents everywhere to loosen up and let their children paint their bedrooms, as Mr. Pausch was allowed to do as a kid (he painted quadratic equations).

Randy Pausch’s Final Lecture: Living in the Process of Dying

A Professor’s Lifetime Lessons: One Man’s Dignity and Courage

Interested readers will find a more detailed article in The Wall Street Journal, which can be accessed here.

Another wonderful article appeared in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, which readers can access here.

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