Last Address: A Remembrance of Loss

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Last Address: A Remembrance of Loss

Last Address is a quietly elegiac documentary short film by filmmaker Ira Sachs that uses exterior images of the houses, apartment buildings and lofts where a group of New York City artists who died of AIDS were living at the time of their deaths to mark the disappearance of a generation.

Keith Haring, Robert Mapplethorpe, Norman René, Peter Hujar, Ethyl Eichelberger, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Cookie Mueller, Klaus Nomi…the list of New York artists who died of AIDS over the last 30 years is countless, and the loss immeasurable. Last Address is a remembrance of that loss, as well as an evocation of the continued presence of these artists’ works in our lives and culture.

Last Address: A Remembrance of Loss

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Creating the Magic Hour: Opening Cómodo

Creating the Magic Hour: Opening Cómodo

Every Thursday night for many months beginning in 2010, Felipe Donnelly and Tamy Rofe invited friends and strangers into their New York City Tribeca apartment for dinner. Each week, six people were offered seats at the long table in the couple’s small one-bedroom home. Donnelly created gourmet Latin-inspired dishes, while Rofe kept the wine glasses full and the guests laughing.

The couple began hosting the weekly dinner parties shortly after they got married, using them as a way to enliven their social lives and give Donnelly an outlet for his cooking ambitions. They also started a blog, called Thursdays at Worth Street, to keep track of recipes and the unique mix of people each dinner attracted.

After some time hosting the increasingly popular dinner parties for strangers in their apartment, the NYC Department of Health took notice and shut them down. Undaunted in their desire to follow their hearts into the world of professional cooking, Tamy and Felipe decided to open a restaurant in Greenwich Village. Opening Cómodo is a documentary short film that tells the story of creating Cómodo, their new little restaurant on MacDougal Street in the village.

Creating the Magic Hour: Opening Cómodo

Thursday at Worth Kitchen

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Stonewall: The Proud Moment the Closet Door Finally Opened

Stonewall: The Proud Moment the Closet Door Finally Opened

America may finally be legalizing gay marriage in 2012, but the real beginning of the modern gay rights movement began in 1969 at NYC’s Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village. On June 28, 1969, police officers raided the Stonewall Inn, which immediately sparked a series of violent protests. To commemorate the event, a parade is held on the last Saturday of June every year. Relive the history of the gay rights movement:

The Stone Wall Against Oppression

The First March: The Closet Door Opens

The Stonewall Riots: A Night That Changed the World

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Rear Window: An Amazing Time-Lapse of Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window”

Rear Window: An Amazing Time-Lapse of Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window

Rear Window is a fascinating three-minute time-lapse short film created by filmmaker Jeff Desom, which is based on Alfred Hitchcock’s classic movie Rear Window (1954). Desom extracted all of the film footage as seen from Jimmy Stewart’s point of view in the movie and stitched it back together. He reconstructed the pieces in a way that created a single panoramic view of the entire Greenwich Village apartment building’s courtyard, while keeping the order of events true to the movie’s plot.

In Hitchcock’s Rear Window, professional photographer L.B. “Jeff” Jeffries, played by Jimmy Stewart, had broken his leg while trying to take an action shot at an auto race. Confined to his Greenwich Village apartment, he spends his days and nights looking out of his apartment’s rear window into the courtyard observing the daily lives of his neighbors. He begins to suspect that a man who lives across the courtyard may have murdered his invalid wife. Jeff enlists the help of his high society girlfriend Lisa and his visiting nurse Stella to investigate.

Rear Window: An Amazing Time-Lapse of Alfred Hitchcock’s “Rear Window”

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen Mode)

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A Year in New York: A Beautiful Visual Symphony

A Year in New York: A Beautiful Visual Symphony

Photography by: Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

A Year in New York is an enchanting, emotionally moving five-minute documentary short film by videographer Andrew Clancy, accompanied by Irish singer/songwriter James Vincent McMorrow’s beautiful song We Don’t Eat. Sometimes words cannot do justice to life in a big city, as A Year in New York so entrancingly confirms. The film reveals that despite the chaos that surrounds urban life, there is a common thread of excitement and resilient optimism.

A Year in New York presents the viewer with a stream of quintessential New York visual imagery, from the No. 7 train rolling past Silvercup Studios’ iconic film and television complex, to die-hard Rangers fans losing it at Madison Square Garden; from runners and rollerbladers cruising through city parks, to late-night, outdoor summer concerts; from blinking beacons on NYPD police cars, to the sparkling lights of the colossal Rockefeller Christmas Tree, resulting in a stunning homage to the city that never sleeps and to its lucky inhabitants.

A Year in New York: A Beautiful Visual Symphony

Photo-Gallery: A Year in New York

(Please Click Image to View Photo-Gallery)

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Thank You for Smoking

Smoker and Graffiti

Worker Smoking in the Garage

Thank You for Smoking

Photography by: Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

Thank You for Smoking is a series of images by New York photographer Joseph O. Holmes, which shows people hiding away to enjoy a smoke. But looking at these pictures, you might not even notice some of the smokers until the last second. The photographer who captured the images in this collection caught some very interesting stories of furtive smokers. But having to sneak their smokes in an atmosphere of such clandestine secrecy…really, have we come to that, guilt?

Slide Show: Thank You for Smoking

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

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Vin Diesel’s Multi-Facial: Not Too Light, Not Too Dark

Vin Diesel’s Multi-Facial: Not Too Light, Not Too Dark

Multi-Facial is a fascinating, emotionally moving 1995 short film that was written, directed and produced by Vin Diesel, who also played the starring role in the film. Whether you’re a cult fan of Vin Diesel’s high-octane action thrillers, or a movie snob who can’t stand him, you need to leave your biases at the door on this one: Multi-Facial is an awesome short film.

As a struggling actor in the early 1990′s, Vin Diesel couldn’t get any jobs. So he went in the time-honored direction for out-of-work actors and made his own film. The semi-autobiographical short film presents a dramatic male monologue about the problems that accompany an actor as he goes to a variety of auditions, due to his multi-ethnic appearance. It was a pretty successful move for him too; the film played at Cannes in 1995, and based largely on the impression the short made upon Steven Spielberg, Diesel was able to land his star-making role in Saving Private Ryan.

Vin Diesel’s monologue in the closing audition scene is unexpectedly emotional, effortlessly and organically concluding the themes built up throughout the film. A wonderful showcase for Diesel’s real talents, the film works amazingly well cinematically, making it one of the greatest short films ever made about acting.

Vin Diesel: Multi-Facial

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