The Street Photography of Alex Webb: Sweet Home Chicago

The Street Photography of Alex Webb: Sweet Home Chicago

Photography by: Alex Webb

Photographs from the Streets of Chicago is a wonderful video photo-essay, a collection of photographs by the acclaimed contemporary street photographer, Alex Webb. Unlike street photographers of the Chicago School (Callahan, Metzger, Sturr and Sterling), Alex Webb has chosen to photograph the city’s multitudinous character in color. Having spent most of his three-decades long career shooting outside of the United States, Webb turns his lens to Chicago during this very important election year.

The Street Photography of Alex Webb: Sweet Home Chicago

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen Mode)

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American Dreams: Iconic Images of 20th Century Life

Richard Avedon, Nastassja Kinski and the Serpent, 1981

Gertrude Käsebier, The Sketch (Beatrice Baxter), 1903

Lewis Hine, Powerhouse Mechanic, 1920

Dorothea Lange, Migrant Mother, Nipomo, California, 1936

Mary Ellen Mark, Lily with Her Rag Doll, Seattle, 1983

American Dreams: Iconic Images of 20th Century Life

American Dreams is a wonderful exhibition that provides a survey of the great American photographers of the 20th century. The exhibition consists of of photographs from arguably the world’s most important photographic museum, George Eastman House, and is currently being shown at Australia’s Bendigo Art Gallery.

The works highlight the pioneering role these American artists have had on the world stage in developing and shaping photography, and the impact these widely published images have had on the greater society. Their far-reaching images helped shape American culture, and had an impact on the fundamental role photography has in communications today. Even more than this, we can see through these artists the burgeoning love of photography that engaged a nation.

These images show us not only the development of photography, but also provide some of the most powerful social documentary photography of the last century. We see extraordinary moments captured in the lives of a wide range of Americans, works that distil the dramatic transformation that affected people during the 20th century: the affluence, degradation, loss, hope and change, both personally and throughout society.

American Dreams: Iconic Images of 20th Century Life

Photo-Gallery: American Dreams/Iconic Images of 20th Century Life

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Harry Callahan: A Retrospective Collection of Later Color Photography

Harry Callahan: A Retrospective Collection of Later Color Photography

An American original and a self-taught photographer, Harry Callahan (1912-1999) was one of the first to do strictly art photography.  Callahan became a major figure in American photography by means of his genius and work ethic.  His photography was his life in many ways, and he told his life through his photography.

Callahan’s only education in photography consisted of attending lectures while a member of the Detroit Photo Guild.  He experienced an exhibit of the photographs of Ansel Adams as an inspiration, and was similarly moved by the work of Alfred Stieglitz.  Within eight years he’d become one of America’s most eloquent poets of the camera. Through the invitation of Lazlo Moholy-Nagy, Callahan become part of the teaching staff of Chicago’s Institute of Design, a continuation of the Bauhaus school of thinking about art that blended in the work of artisans with the fine arts.

From the late 1940s to early 1960s, his central model and muse was his wife Eleanor Callahan, and after 1950, his daughter Barbara.  By the 1970s he had begun to focus on color photography, and a number of those works are represented in this collection.

A Documentary Interview: Harry Callahans’s Visions and Images

Slide Show: Harry Callahan’s Later Color Photography

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Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance and the Camera

Exposed: Voyeurism, Surveillance and the Camera

Exposed is a photographic collection presently on exhibition at London’s Tate Modern Gallery, which offers a fascinating look at pictures made on the sly, without the explicit permission of the people depicted.  With photographs from the late nineteenth century to present day, the pictures present a shocking, illuminating and sometimes witty perspective on iconic and taboo subjects.  Exposed presents 250 works by celebrated artists and photographers, including Weegee, Guy Bourdin, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Philip Lorca DiCorcia, Walker Evans, Robert Frank, Nan Goldin, Harry Callahan, Lee Miller, Helmut Newton and Man Ray.

The United Kingdom is now the most surveyed country in the world, fostering an obsession with voyeurism, privacy laws, freedom of media, and surveillance, images captured and relayed on camera phones, YouTube or reality TV.  Much of Exposed focuses on surveillance, and the issues raised are particularly relevant in the current climate, with debates raging around the rights and desires of individuals, terrorism and the increasing availability and use of surveillance.  Exposed confronts these issues and their implications head-on.

Exposed at Tate Modern: Sandra Phillips on Celebrity Photography

Exposed: Richard Gordon on Voyeurism, Surveillance and the Camera

Slide Show: Exposed/Voyeurism, Surveillance and the Camera

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Beyond Color: Early Works in American Color Photography (1950-1970)

Beyond Color: Early Works in American Color Photography (1950-1970)

Beyond Color is a stunning collection of vintage color photographs presented by the Bruce Silverstein Gallery in New York City.  The photographs represent a re-examination of a pivotal period in photography’s short history, when the artistic relevance of color in fine art photography had not yet been determined.  Over the past forty years, work in color created by artists during this formative period has received little attention.

This collection brings together for the first time works by many of the first generation practitioners of color photography, including artists Marie Cosindas, Arthur Seigel, Harry Callahan, Eliot Porter, Saul Leiter, Marvin E. Newman, Pete Turner, Ruth Orkin Ernst Haas and  Inge Morath.  Beyond Color attempts to reclaim this moment of photographic history that only today has begun to receive critical attention.

Beyond Color: Color in American Photography, 1950-1970

Slide Show: Beyond Color/Early Works in American Color Photography

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Photos of the Day: Visions of Auto-Magic Through the Years

Photos of the Day: Visions of Auto-Magic Through the Years

Visions of Auto-Magic is a captivating collection of photographs of automobiles through the years, images that often transform the ordinary of urban daily life into intense images that sizzle and delight the eye.  The photographs range from very early street pictures, to more recent highly abstract views.  The master photographers represented in this photo-essay include: Walker Evans, Alfred Steiglitz,  Ray K. Metzker, Dennis Stock and Harry Callahan.

The Rolls-Royce Ghost: The 2009 World Premiere

Slide Show: Visions of Auto-Magic Through the Years

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In the Face of a Camera: The Melodramatic Imagination

An Official Portrait: Queen Elizabeth II

Photography by: Annie Leibovitz

Natassja Kinski, Vogue Magazine (1981)

Photography by: Richard Avedon

Women by the Windows

Photography by: Harry Callahan

Carl Sandburg Waiting in a Chicago Nursing Home

Photography by: Lee Balterman

Contrasting Complement: Ken Moody and Robert Sherman

Photography by: Robert Mapplethorpe

A Fleeting Tender Moment

Photography by: Robert Mapplethorpe

Marilyn Monroe, New York City (1957)

Photography by: Richard Avedon

Barren Trees: Winter on Chicago’s Lake Michigan

Photography by: Harry Callahan

Just About Half-Past Ten, it’s Raining Men! Hallelujah! Amen!

The Last Words Never Spoken

Alone in the Subway Tunnel

Mikhail Barishnekov: The Piano Strut

Photography by: Annie Leibovitz

Alone at Night: Quiet Solitude at the Shore

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