Fjögur Píanó: Mind-Controlled Slavery, Addiction, Drugs and Violent Sex

Fjögur Píanó: Mind-Controlled Slavery, Addiction, Drugs and Violent Sex

Fjögur Píanó is a thoughtful, haunting short film/music video created by Israeli director Alma Har’el, set to music by the acclaimed Icelandic band Sigur Rós. The band recently asked a dozen filmmakers to each choose a song from its new album, Valtari; given complete creative freedom, filmmaker Alma Har’el produced a seven-minute video that at first appears to be more of a dream sequence than a narrative. Fjögur Píanó is a wordless song comprised of four piano pieces that features actor Shia LaBeouf and actress Denna Thomsen in a stormy relationship, caught up in a destructive spiral, possibly revolving around mind-controlled drug addiction, lovesick co-dependence and sordid sexuality mixed with dominance and violence.

It is evident throughout the film that the couple is very confused, not in control of their destiny and hopelessly trapped in a state of virtual imprisonment. Much of the film’s symbolism hints at the concept of Monarch Mind Control. Monarch Mind Control is named after the Monarch butterfly, a genetically programmed insect that begins its life as a worm (representing undeveloped potential) and, after a period of cocooning (biological programming), is reborn as a beautiful butterfly (the Monarch slave).

From this perspective, Fjögur Píanó can be viewed as a dark commentary on a world of increasingly abusive totalitarian domination. Every aspect of Shia and Denna’s lives is manipulated by outside forces. Their living environment is controlled and modified by their handlers: they are drugged, blindfolded and forcibly taken on weird, dissociative trips. Attempts to break free from the cruel domination are useless. The couple is utterly powerless when confronted by the world around them, and in the end the only thing Shia can do is cut another bloody tally mark into Denna’s back.

Fjögur Píanó: Mind-Controlled Slavery, Addiction, Drugs and Violent Sex

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Good Weather For Airstrikes: The Innocence of a Stolen Kiss

Good Weather For Airstrikes: The Innocence of a Stolen Kiss

Viðrar Vel Til Loftárása (Good Weather For Airstrikes) is a very brave, very emotional song by Sigur Ros, from their 2000 album Ágætis Byrjun, which was recently released in a 10th anniversary edition.  The music video was directed by Arni and Kinski, where the music, the technique, everything is perfect.  Such a masterpiece, and one can’t help but love the innocence of the stolen kiss!

This one is for the U.S. National Soccer team, maybe they’ll celebrate their goals this way in the next match!

Good Weather For Airstrikes: The Innocence of a Stolen Kiss

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Eyjafjallajökull: The Volcanic Eruption on Iceland

Eyjafjallajökull: The Volcanic Eruption on Iceland

Eyjafjallajökull is one of the smaller glaciers of Iceland, which covers a volcano that has erupted relatively frequently.  It has erupted twice in 2010, on March 20th and April 14th.  The March event forced a brief evacuation of around 500 people, but the April eruption was ten to twenty times more powerful and caused substantial disruption to air traffic all across Northern Europe.

Eyjafjallajökull is an incredible three-minute documentary short film by Marc Szeglat, with some of  the most amazing shots of volcanic activity ever seen.

Eyjafjallajökull: The Volcanic Eruption on Iceland

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen Mode)

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As Lemmings to the Sea: Drowned in Sound

As Lemmings to the Sea: Drowned in Sound

Glosoli, by the avant-garde Icelandic band Sigur Ros, has received widespread acclaim for both its music and the highly artistic cinematographic music video.  The video consists of a group of Icelandic children migrating towards an unknown destination somewhere in Iceland.  Led by a drummer-boy, the children travel through a land characterized by open fields and rocky hills, all the while picking up more and more children.  The group then falls asleep, the video entering a dream-like state signified by a change in hue.  The music reaches its pinnacle at the end when the children finally reach a large hill and the leader starts beating his drum feverishly. As the song climaxes, the children start to run full speed up the hill.   It is then that the hill is shown to be in fact a cliff, coming to an end at the ocean.  When the children eventually reach the edge of the cliff, they jump off and swim through the air.  The video contains an ambiguous conclusion, when the last and youngest child is shown to be hesitant to jump off the cliff, but ends up taking a reluctant leap.

Sigur Ros: Glosoli

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Knut and Leonardo DiCaprio: Photography by Annie Leibovitz

Leonardo DiCaprio and Knut: Photography by Annie Leibovitz

While the Bush administration continues to waste time dithering about whether or not to add polar bears to the endangered-species list, the world has been celebrating the birth of Knut, the darling cub born in captivity at The Berlin Zoo.  Now four months old, little Knut has become a powerful symbol of what we have to lose to global warming.  Famed photographer Annie Leibovitz has taken Knut’s portrait for the cover of this year’s Vanity Fair Green Issue.

In behind-the-scenes photographs presented in the short slideshow below, Leibovitz and Vanity Fair Senior Photography Producer Kathryn MacLeod show Knut at home in The Berlin Zoo, and portray actor/environmental activist Leonardo DiCaprio at the Jökulsárlón glacier lagoon, in southeast Iceland.

(Click Image for Slideshow)

Behind the Scenes at the Annie Liebovitz Cover Shoot of Knut

Knut at the Berlin Zoo

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