Heavenly Calm: Water and Color

Heavenly Calm: Water and Color

Water and Color is a beautiful, calming four-minute CG animated short film by Iranian filmmaker Hassan Rezakhani.  Computer graphics animation was born abstract, with photo realism coming later.  This film provides a wonderful example of abstract animation, where the distinctions between microcosm and macrocosm are blurred, or completely disappear.  The stunning images in this short film could be galaxies colliding, or gametes fusing together or fantasies overlapping.  Whatever they depict, they’re engagingly peaceful.

Heavenly Calm: Water and Color

(Best Viewed in Full-Screen Mode)

Please Share This:

Share

Yellow Cake: A Modern Parable of Terrorism and Devastating War

Yellow Cake: A Modern Parable of Terrorism and Devastating War

Yellow Cake is a short animated film by the award-winning Canadian animator Nick Cross.  Cross explains that he got the idea for the film in 2003, in light of speculation during the Bush administration that Iraq was buying uranium powder called “Yellow Cake.”  Yellow Cake Uranium was one of the Weapons of Mass Destruction that Iraq allegedly possessed.  Cross’s fantastic animated epic becomes a modern parable of terrorism and catastrophic war, a lamentable tragedy featuring geopolitical bullying, social unrest and worker revolt. In the end, as with most revolutions, the revolt is both crushed by foreign intervention and corrupted from the inside until it becomes as evil as the regime the workers had originally fought.

Yellow Cake initially lures the viewer into a tale of pleasant mirth, filled with adorable blue creatures who spend all day baking and then eating their own  exquisitely delicious yellow cakes.  However, by the end of the film the small town of happy little bakers has been driven to terrorism by the greed of their leader and cake-hungry fat cats, resulting in the town’s ultimate catastrophic destruction.  It seems that no matter what they do, the oppressed have no hope left.

Yellow Cake: A Modern Parable of Terrorism and Devastating War

Please Share This:

Iran’s Nation of Bloggers: A Means of Revolution

Iran’s Nation of Bloggers: A Means of Revolution

Political dissent in Iran in the aftermath of last week’s national election has spread not only to the streets of Tehran, but also online, where protesters of President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad and election observers have battled to get news out of the country for three days. Cellphone service was restored on Sunday after it had been down since Saturday, but Iranians could still not send text messages. Government filters have also cracked down on opposition party websites and social networking websites. Satellite internet connections have also been disrupted.

Foreign media outlets have found themselves coming under attack as they attempt to report on the protests ever since the official announcement that President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad had won a resounding victory in Friday’s poll. However, the government’s crackdown hasn’t prevented Iran’s young bloggers and activists from reporting by using proxy servers to get around the censors in a game of cat and mouse. Iran’s youthful and Web-savvy population has proven adept at using Twitter, blogs, mobile phones and social networks to spread the word about the post-election discord. Technology has proven to be extremely important in bypassing the government’s attempts to crackdown on dissent.

Millions of young bloggers are challenging the conservative government of Iran, at great personal risk. Iran: A Nation of Bloggers is an “infographic” video from the Vancouver Film School that powerfully tells this story in just 2 minutes. It explores how the digital world allows many Iranians access to ideas and freedom of expression they haven’t had for close to thirty years. Iran: A Nation of Bloggers is a visual essay that illustrates how blogging is a major cultural outlet for thousands of Iranians, despite it being a sometimes dangerous practice. Blogging is, in essence, a means of revolution.

Iran: A Nation of Bloggers

Reporters Without Borders: For Press Freedom Here.

Please Share This:

%d bloggers like this: