The Little Submarine: Soccer, Food, Hot Women and a Very Sexy Blastoff!

The Little Submarine: Soccer, Food, Hot Women and a Very Sexy Blastoff!

Sub! is an award-winning, very strange Rhode Island School of Design animated short film by Jesse Schmal. The epic film’s totally got the goods; the short’s weird, wickedly funny, and sad, and then weird again.

Sub! begins with an Italian piazza being invaded by an unlikely intruder. A little submarine suddenly bursts out of the piazza’s fountain, becoming a link between all the characters there. The funny film shows what each character does with the little submarine to get themselves out of the jam in which they started off: the dog won’t eat, there’s no whistle to start the soccer match and the sexy woman won’t accept a lusty dude’s advances.

The Little Submarine: Soccer, Food, Hot Women and a Very Sexy Blastoff!

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Silent World: An Apocalyptic Photo Series

Silent World: An Apocalyptic Photo Series

Photography by: Lucie & Simon, Paris

Silent World is an engrossing short film comprised of an apocalyptic series of photographs by Paris-based filmmakers/photographers Lucie & Simon, set to the music of Philip Glass and Daft Punk. When you think of ghost towns, your mind doesn’t typically gravitate to New York City, Paris or Beijing. Yet that’s what these teeming cities have become in the hands of Lucie & Simon.

Lucie & Simon have used a digital scalpel and a special filter to remove humans from the city landscapes. They have left just enough evidence of our species’ presence, a lone woman in a blood-red coat in Madison Square Garden or a hoisted flag in Tiananmen Square, to make the mysterious, mass disappearances as uncannily disturbing as possible.

Many city dwellers no doubt have dreamed of a magically emptied and peaceful metropolis. But Silent World suggests that life would not be so peaceful in a completely silent city. It’s unnatural and threatening; the uneasy feeling of being the last person on earth could build and build until one goes mad.

Silent World: An Apocalyptic Photo Series

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Cy Twombly: Scratching and Scribbling to the Heights of Abstract Expressionism

Cy Twombly, 2005

Wilder Shores of Love, Bassano in Teverina, 1985

Ferragosto IV, 1961

School of Athens, 1964

Lepanto, 2001

Cy Twombly: Scratching and Scribbling to the Heights of Abstract Expressionism

Cy Twombly (1928-2011), whose spare, delicate scratching and scribbling, odd marks, raw smudges, and gorgeous visceral color with intimations of myth, narrative and poetic engagement with antiquity left him often ignored by the movements of postwar American art, even as he eventually became one of the era’s most significant painters, died on Tuesday in Rome. He was 83.

His artistic career roguishly subverted Abstract Expressionism, dipped briefly into Minimalism, barely acknowledged Pop art, but anticipated some of the concerns of Conceptualism, Mr. Twombly was a polarizing figure in the art world almost from the beginning. His work has been described by one important art curator as “influential among artists, discomfiting to many critics and truculently difficult not just for a broad public, but for sophisticated initiates of postwar art as well.”

Twombly left New York City and moved permanently to southern Italy in 1957 and paid little heed to his many critics, who questioned constantly whether his work really deserved a place at the forefront of 20th century abstraction. The low point for Twombly probably came after a widely panned 1964 exhibition in New York, which one critic described as a blatant fiasco. However, he lived long enough to see his work receive new-found attention and a degree of critical favor he had never enjoyed before. By the 1990s, he had become highly sought after not only by European museums and collectors, who had appreciated his work early on, but also by those back in the United States who had not known what to make of him two decades before.

During the final decade of his life, Twombly surpassed his earlier body of work, making tremendous late abstract works telling tales of ancient armies, otherworldly invasions of burning suns and radiating chrysanthemums. His works from this later period invoked twelfth-century dynasties, exoduses, love, loss and longing. He had launched upon a creative journey to some artistic place where the deepest of feelings, experiences, expectations, dreams, and love become one.

Read more about Cy Twombly in The New York Times here.

Tributes Flow After Death of Artist Cy Twombly

Cy Twombly: Lepanto-Cycle at Museum Brandhorst, Munich

Slide Show: Cy Twombly/Scribbling to the Heights of Abstract Expressionism

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

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My Father’s Garden: A Tiny World of Pristine Beauty

My Father’s Garden: A Tiny World of Pristine Beauty

My Father’s Garden is a stunning short film by the Italian filmmaker Mirko Faienza, a subtle and creative personal artistic work of pristine beauty. Faienza  describes the film as, “Discovering a whole tiny world in my father’s small garden. There is a small pond with small falls, some stones, some plants and plenty of life.”

If you haven’t seen the film before, be prepared to be amazed. And if you have seen it, please watch it again and be amazed once more!

My Father’s Garden: A Tiny World of Pristine Beauty

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen Mode)

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Alone in New York: Moments of Solitude and Loneliness

Alone in New York: Moments of Solitude and Loneliness

Alone in New York is a  beautiful 2-minute short film by the Italian filmmaker Giuseppe Vetrano, which was filmed in New York City last winter.   Accompanied by music on the piano and drums, the  film presents a captivating succession of moments of solitude and loneliness in the soul of a city that never sleeps.

Alone in New York: Moments of Solitude and Loneliness

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Suddenly, Last Summer: A Place for a Moment, an End to a Dream

Suddenly, Last Summer: A Place for a Moment, an End to Dream

Suddenly, Last Summer is a 2-minute short film by the Italian filmmaker Leonardo Dalessandri, with music provided by Flashbulb’s “Alice’s garden.”  The film captures moments of lush beauty, as a tranquil ending to summer dreams.  The colors, the music, the angles, the light and the randomness of the captured imagery combine to produce a magical synergy in symphony.  At times, the film is whimsical and impressionistic, with evocative images that suggest an air of mystery. Suddenly, Last Summer is a quiet moment of Zen…leaving the viewer feeling at peace.

Suddenly, Last Summer: A Place for a Moment, an End to a Dream

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Trees: A Poetic Documentary about the Destruction of Trees

Trees: A Poetic Documentary about the Destruction of Trees

Only takes one tree, to make a thousand matches
Only takes one match, to burn a thousand trees
A thousand trees.

Trees (Alberi) is a 5-min. short animated poetic documentary about trees and the environmental destruction of our forests, which was made by 22 Italian pupils (9 years old) during their Art and Music classes.  The short animated film was directed and edited by their teacher, Raffaella Traniello.  In the process of creating this work, the young students learned to play the recorder, played a real concert harp and spent 2 years learning watercolor techniques to paint the sky, bushes and trees.

Trees: A Poetic Documentary about the Destruction of Trees

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