In the Face of a Camera: The Melodramatic Imagination

An Official Portrait: Queen Elizabeth II

Photography by: Annie Leibovitz

Natassja Kinski, Vogue Magazine (1981)

Photography by: Richard Avedon

Women by the Windows

Photography by: Harry Callahan

Carl Sandburg Waiting in a Chicago Nursing Home

Photography by: Lee Balterman

Contrasting Complement: Ken Moody and Robert Sherman

Photography by: Robert Mapplethorpe

A Fleeting Tender Moment

Photography by: Robert Mapplethorpe

Marilyn Monroe, New York City (1957)

Photography by: Richard Avedon

Barren Trees: Winter on Chicago’s Lake Michigan

Photography by: Harry Callahan

Just About Half-Past Ten, it’s Raining Men! Hallelujah! Amen!

The Last Words Never Spoken

Alone in the Subway Tunnel

Mikhail Barishnekov: The Piano Strut

Photography by: Annie Leibovitz

Alone at Night: Quiet Solitude at the Shore

TechnoratiTechnorati: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Please Be Social:

Lee Balterman Photography: A Video Album of 1940’s Chicago Life

Carl Sandburg: Photograph by Lee Balterman

It would be hard to find a less theoretical artist than eighty six year-old Lee Balterman.  Balterman made his living as a Chicago-based photographer for Time, Life, Fortune, Sports Illustrated and other top magazines, producing memorable, even iconic celebrity portraits.  For example, his photographic portraits have included an ebullient President Eisenhower on a campaign swing, a ghostly Carl Sandburg staring into space in a lonely firehouse (see above) and a “Shaft”-era Isaac Hayes, conducting business by phone in the plush luxury of his white limousine.

Lee Balterman’s Chicago may be long gone, but it’s still a very interesting place to visit.  “I’m crazy about pictures,” he says.  “I went around with a camera, and when I saw something — boom!  You know, real fast.”  And unlike some of his peers in the history of local street photography, he always preferred people to buildings.  “Yeah, I like people,” he says with a twinkle in his eye.  “More or less.”

Lee Balterman: Photographs of 1940’s Chicago Life

TechnoratiTechnorati: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Please Share This:

Share

Lee Balterman: Photographs of a Chicago Long-Gone

Lee Balterman: Carl Sandburg

Lee Balterman: Photographs of 1940s/50s/60s in Chicago

It would be hard to find a less theoretical artist than eighty five year-old Lee Balterman.  Balterman made his living as a Chicago-based photographer for Time, Life, Fortune, Sports Illustrated and other top magazines, producing memorable, even iconic celebrity portraits (for example, an ebullient President Eisenhower on a campaign swing, a ghostly Carl Sandburg staring into space in a lonely firehouse, a “Shaft”-era Isaac Hayes, conducting business by phone in the plush luxury of a white limousine).  Lee Balterman’s Chicago may be long gone, but it’s still a great place to visit.

I’m crazy about pictures,” he says.  “I went around with a camera, and when I saw something — boom! You know, real fast.”  And unlike some of his peers in the history of local street photography, he always preferred people to buildings.  “Yeah, I like people,” he says with a twinkle in his eye.  “More or less.”

Lee Balterman: Photographs of  Chicago in the 1940s

Slide Show: Lee Balterman’s Photographs of a Chicago Long-Gone

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

Please Share This:



Share

%d bloggers like this: