The Street Photography of Alex Webb: Sweet Home Chicago

The Street Photography of Alex Webb: Sweet Home Chicago

Photography by: Alex Webb

Photographs from the Streets of Chicago is a wonderful video photo-essay, a collection of photographs by the acclaimed contemporary street photographer, Alex Webb. Unlike street photographers of the Chicago School (Callahan, Metzger, Sturr and Sterling), Alex Webb has chosen to photograph the city’s multitudinous character in color. Having spent most of his three-decades long career shooting outside of the United States, Webb turns his lens to Chicago during this very important election year.

The Street Photography of Alex Webb: Sweet Home Chicago

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen Mode)

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Dorothea Lange: Three Mormon Towns

Dorothea Lange, Couple Seated on Porch, Gunlock, Utah, 1953

Dorothea Lange, Anne Carter Johnson, St. George, Utah, 1953

Dorothea Lange, Riley Savage, Toquerville, Utah, 1953

Dorothea Lange, Jake Jones’ Hands, Gunlock, Utah, 1953

Dorothea Lange, Horseplay, Gunlock, Utah, 1953

Dorothea Lange: Three Mormon Towns

In August 1953, renowned American photographer Dorothea Lange traveled to southern Utah where she met up with her long-time friend Ansel Adams. The two photographers spent three weeks photographing the landscape and people of Toquerville, Gunlock and St. George. Lange’s enthusiasm for her subject yielded hundreds of photographs. Thirty-five of those photographs were published as Three Mormon Towns in the September 6, 1954 issue of Life Magazine.

Dorothea Lange’s Three Mormon Towns was recently displayed in exhibition at the Brigham Young University Museum of Art. Three Mormon Towns represents a bridge between Lange’s famous Depression Era photographs and her later detailed photographic essays of the 1950s. Known for her candid and sympathetic depiction of people, Three Mormon Towns presents a study of contrasts: of old and new, of quiet villages and a growing city, of deep roots and transient highways. In this series of photographs, Lange memorialized the dignity and simplicity of agrarian life in light of post-war urbanization.

Dorothea Lange: Portraiture and Documentary Photography

Slide Show: Dorothea Lange/Three Mormon Towns

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Senate Strikes Down “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Policy

Photography by: Jeff Sheng, Los Angeles

Senate Strikes Down “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Policy

In a major victory for gay rights advocates as well as President Obama, the Senate on Saturday repealed the ban on gay men and lesbians serving openly in the military.  The repeal of DADT closed a 17-year struggle over a policy that forced thousands of Americans to leave the ranks of the military and caused others to keep secret their sexual orientation.

By a vote of 65 to 31, the Senate approved and sent to President Obama a repeal of the Clinton-era law, known as Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell, a policy that critics said amounted to government-sanctioned discrimination, which treated gay and lesbian troops as second-class citizens.  The President is expected to sign the measure into law next week, delivering Pres. Obama a victory on one of his chief campaign promises.

Breaking News: Senate Repeals Pentagon’s “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Policy

Democrats and Activists Speak After “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Repeal

Bright Eyes: First Day of My Life

Slide Show: DADT/We Have To Give Them Hope

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DADT: We Have To Give Them Hope

DADT: We Have To Give Them Hope

Photography by:  Jeff Sheng, Los Angeles

Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell is a deeply touching series of portraits by Jeff Sheng, photographs of gay men and lesbians serving in the military, all of them in uniform and with their faces obscured in some way, by a hand, a door frame or by darkness.  The portraits are pervaded by a sense of lonely sadness and isolation.

Mr. Sheng has described his subjects, identified only by first names that are pseudonyms, as people who “didn’t want to risk their careers, but who wanted to take some kind of stand.”  Earnest and passionate about his work, Mr. Sheng said he struggles to avoid being heavy-handed as an artist.  “I merge a fight for social equality with photography, but I’m always trying to figure out how to do it intelligently,” he said.

Bright Eyes: First Day of My Life

Slide Show: DADT/We Have To Give Them Hope

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Photos of the Day: Portraits of Carnival Workers

Photos of the Day: Portraits of Carnival Workers

Photography by:  Jeff Seltzer, Los Angeles

Carnivals is a wonderful photo-essay by photographer Jeff Seltzer, a collection of images of people who work at carnivals.  Seltzer describes the Carnivals project: “The images were captured at three different local carnivals almost as an accident.  I was just taking some family snapshots, when I noticed one of the workers looking-on with a very stoic expression.  Interestingly, I saw many of the same workers at all three venues.  Some see irony in the portraits, a sense of depression among the workers.  I see a bit of this, but mostly just portraits of hard workers trying to make a very tough living.  The carnival might be fun for attendees, but not for the workers.”

The muted colors in these photographs of the carnival workers, taken at dusk or night without flash, provide images that are sympathetic without being garish or patronizing, and reveal a sensitivity rarely shown when documenting this subject.

Carnivals: Friday Night Lights

Slide Show: Portraits of Carnival Workers

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Children of the Storm: Five Years After Hurricane Katrina

Children of the Storm: Five Years After Hurricane Katrina

The unbelievable devastation of New Orleans is almost beyond human comprehension.  The virtually complete destruction of the entire city by Hurricane Katrina, the loss of huge numbers of lives, the ruination of the property and lives of so many, especially the poor and disadvantaged, is a tragedy of historically monumental proportions.

This year, photographer Brenda Ann Kenneally revisited two families five years after Hurricane Katrina and created this photo-essay about the effect of Katrina on children who are living along the Gulf Coast.

Children of the Storm: Five Years After Hurricane Katrina

In Katrina’s Wake: Portraits of Tragic Loss

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The Capacity to Be Alone, All by My Self

The Capacity to Be Alone, All by My Self

The psychological capacity to be alone, as opposed to feeling lonely, is said to be the foundation for a sense of the self or of who we are. In addition, it nourishes growth promoting introspective thought, imagination and creativity. The media composition presented here today, which is comprised of photographs, a short film and a photo-gallery, represents the beginning of developing a small composition that portrays the differing experiences of loneliness, solitude and being alone. The piece will be modified each day, with a final set of writings, photographs, a short film and a photo-gallery appearing here by January 1st.

Alone, All by My Self

The Capacity to Be Alone, All by My Self

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