Paths of Hate: The Destructive Fury of War

Paths of Hate: The Destructive Fury of War

Paths of Hate is an animated ten-minute short film directed by Damian Nenow at Platige Image, which is in the running for a 2012 Oscar for animated short films. The film was named on a list of 10 films that was released last week by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; three to five nominees for the Oscar will be chosen from this list.

Paths of Hate contains stunning visuals that recreate a WWII-era aerial dogfight and presents a dynamic tale about the hatred that seems to be an indispensable element of human nature. Damien Nenow, a recent graduate of Poland’s Lodz Film School, has created a film of great visual power, which brilliantly shows the demons that slumber deep within the human soul and have the power to push people into the abyss of blind hate, fury and rage. The finale of the film introduces a surreal turn of events, which stands as the director’s bitter comment on the bloody destructive fury of war.

Paths of Hate: The Destructive Fury of War

Please Share This:

Share

The Sultry Chick: A Hot and Steamy Night of Torrid Sex

The Sultry Chick: A Hot and Steamy Night of Torrid Sex

Chick is an award-winning, wickedly funny five-minute animated short film by the Polish graphic and animation artist Michal Socha. It’s the naughty tale of a raucous evening of intensely hot and heavy sex, a design tour de force that casts a jaundiced eye upon a couple’s steamy night of wild lust. Their evening date quickly devolves into a darkly torrid roll-in-the hay, a boffo one-night-stand that ultimately leads to an unexpectedly shocking eye-for-an-eye climax. Next!

The Sultry Chick: A Hot and Steamy Night of Torrid Sex

Please Share This:

Share

Ark: The Exodus of Earth’s Only Remaining Survivors

Ark: The Exodus of Earth’s Only Remaining Survivors

Ark is an award-winning animated short film by Polish director Grzegorz Jonkajtys, which screened at the Cannes Film Festival and won the SIGGRAPH Computer Animation Festival in 2007.  In this fantastic film, an unknown virus has destroyed almost the entire human population.  Oblivious to the true nature of the disease, the only remaining survivors escape to the sea on massive ships in search of uninhabited land.  The story focuses on one man as he struggles with his life and his new found knowledge of the voyage.  As the spotlight shines on the man, you’re immediately pulled into his frame of mind, only to be shocked by the twist at the end.

Ark: The Exodus of Earth’s Only Remaining Survivors

Please Share This:

Share

Portraits of Life and Loss: The Holocaust and Beyond

Portraits of Life and Loss: The Holocaust and Beyond

Photographs by: Jeffrey Gusky, MD, Mt. Vernon, Texas

Portraits of Life and Loss pairs the work of Roman Vishniac and Jeffrey Gusky, two photographers who wandered the same areas some six decades apart.  Vishniac explored Poland’s Jewish villages of the 1930s and 1940s, documenting communities in peril during an era of growing anti-Semitism.  Gusky’s late-20th-century visits to the same country took him to the sites where those communities once stood.

While Vishniac captured the spirit of a people, their crowded, vibrant communities, pulsing with life, Gusky’s visual journey examines the ghosts they left behind.  Returning to the quiet landscapes that once nourished Jewish life, Gusky found crumbling synagogues, ghetto walls, and silent streets that once hosted bustling markets, and his photographs resound hauntingly, with an almost specter-like aura.

Photographs by Roman Vishniac: A Vanished World

Gorecki Symphony No. 3, “Symphony of Sorrowful Songs”

Slide Show: Portraits of Life and Loss/The Holocaust and Beyond

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

Please Share This:

Share

Chilly Winter Snow Scenes

The Nazi Holocaust: A Tribute to Janusz Korczak

Auschwitz: “Good Work Will Make Men Free”

Although this picture displays the deceitful welcoming message above the entry to the Auschwitz death camp, this brief note is written as a memorial for Janusz Korczak, a Polish Jew.

A few years after graduating from medical school, in 1912 Korczak became the director of the Jewish orphanage of Warsaw, providing empathic, clinically insightful care for children from the slums. From then on until his death, he worked at the orphanage.

Shortly after the beginning of the Nazis occupation of Warsaw, an order was made by the Germans demanding that all Jewish persons had to live in a small area of Warsaw that came to be known as the infamous “Warsaw Ghetto”, where they would be destined to perish. The orphanage that Korczak directed was also ordered to relocate to the ghetto, and he continued his work at the orphanage there.

On August 6, 1942, the Nazis issued an order that the two hundred children living in the Jewish orphanage of the Warsaw Ghetto were to be taken to a train station and packed into railroad cars. Korczak, like other Jews in the ghetto, knew that the train’s destination was the Treblinka death camp, where all of the children would be murdered in the gas chambers of Treblinka.

On the designated day for their arrival at the train station, Korczak appointed the oldest boy in the orphanage to lead the group, carrying a flag of hope, a four-leaf clover on a field of green–the emblem of the orphanage. Korczak walked immediately behind this leader, gently holding the hands of the two youngest children. Behind them, in excellent order, marched all the other children of the orphanage. The impression of the children’s self-confidence struck the policemen, who previously had been whipping and cursing the Jews into the railroad cars, so much that they immediately snapped to attention and officially saluted them. One of the guards was so deeply moved by this unexpected event that he told Korczak to leave–adamantly stating that only the children had been ordered to board the train. As he tried to move Korczak away from the children, Korczak refused to separate himself from the children and went with them to Treblinka, where they all would die.

Korczak’s freely chosen death would signify the utter righteousness of his life. After World War II, Janusz Korczak became a legend in Poland, Europe and other countries outside of Europe. He was posthumously awarded the German Peace Price and honored on the hundredth anniversary of his birthday by UNESCO officially declaring that year to be Korczak Year, as well as by Poland and many other countries. Pope Paul II stated that in our modern world, Janusz Korczak was a symbol of true religion and morality.

He should be memorialized today, serving to provide a true example for those who continue to work with young persons, as one who devoted his own life’s work as the most devoted friend of children.

Please Share This:

Share

%d bloggers like this: