That Sticky Candy: Subverting Conventional Stereotypes of Gay Identity

Shadow Play

O Pioneers

Nature versus Industry

That Sticky Candy: Subverting Conventional Stereotypes of Gay Identity

Figurative Art by:  Scott Hunt, NYC

That Sticky Candy is a series of figurative art pieces by Scott Hunt, an artist whose work has been exhibited internationally and whose art is part of the permanent collection of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.  These charcoal and pastel drawings take their inspiration from 1940s and 50s photography; they present and subvert conventional perceptions of gay identity.  Hunt tackles the theme of homosexuality without the demure or closeted strategies often associated with gay subject matter in art.  In doing so, one discovers that his direct approach to homosexuality and gay male sexuality in visual art is, in a way, surreal as well.

For Hunt, the title of this series refers to a metaphor that speaks about how something that one might crave and be pleasured by can become messy and constricting.  In particular, gay men have been yoked to the  idea that they are hypersexual beings, and in this work Hunt attempts to point out how limiting that is, that a gay identity is infinitely more complex and broad than that.

A Slide Show: That Sticky Candy/Subverting Conventional Stereotypes of Gay Identity

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

Please Share This:

The Art of Mysterious Old American Snapshots

Nature versus Industry

And Red All Over

Death and the Maiden: Musical Interlude

The Art of Mysterious Old American Snapshots

Figurative Artwork by:  Scott Hunt, NYC

Scott Hunt is a figurative artist whose discipline is drawing (charcoal and pastel on paper); he has shown internationally, and his work is part of the permanent collection of the Israel Museum, Jerusalem.  Hunt’s drawings have a droll, subtly wry quality and take their inspiration from mysterious, uncomfortable, hilarious and sad moments in 1940s and 50s amateur photography, conferring upon them a new sense of life.

Hunt describes other people’s snapshots as “little mysteries; they have a history that’s lost and that can’t be accessed.  That severed link to the past fascinates me and gives me a vague sense of anxiety that compels me to create my own stories about who these people were, what brought them to this particular moment in time, and what preceded and followed the snap of the shutter.”

Slide Show: The Art of Mysterious Old American Snapshots

(Please Click Image to View the Slide Show)

Please Share This:

%d bloggers like this: