Up Close: Photographs of Candid Intimacy

Up Close: Photographs of Candid Intimacy

Up Close is a collection of photographs on exhibition at Australia’s Heide Museum of Modern Art, featuring the exceptional talent of four photographers whose images capture people, places and events with candid intimacy.  Up Close traces the significant legacy of Australian photographer Carol Jerrems (1949–1980) alongside that of contemporary artists Larry Clark (USA), Nan Goldin (USA) and William Yang (Sydney).  The collection takes its inspiration from the way each artist candidly depicts a social milieu and urban life of the 1970s and early 1980s.  Sharing an interest in sub-cultural groups and individuals on the margins of society, each artist reveals a remarkable capacity to provide an empathetic glimpse into semi-private worlds through intimate depictions of people and their surroundings.

Jerrems’ photography was associated with a feminist and political imperative, a preoccupation with  subcultures, forgotten and dispossessed groups, especially Aboriginal communities of the time.  Larry Clark unflinchingly turned the camera onto himself and his amphetamine-shooting coterie to produce Tulsa (1971), a series of photographs repeatedly cited for its raw depiction of marginalized youth.  With its grainy shot-from-the-hip style, Tulsa exposes a world of sex, death, violence, anxiety and boredom capturing the aimlessness and ennui of teenagers.

Larry Clark’s work influenced Nan Goldin and a whole generation of artists who aspired to break with the more traditional documentary modes.  Mining the emotional depths of her friends, lovers and family, Goldin’s work reveals a riveting intimacy while  uncovering the bohemian life of New York’s Lower East Side.  Goldin says, “I was documenting my life.  It comes directly from the snapshot, which is always about love.”

William Yang’s photographs from the 1970s further the snapshot aesthetic through journeying into the intimate world of his particular social milieu: drag queens, Sydney gay and inner-city culture.  Yang’s direct, unpretentious photographs provide a unique chronicle of marginalised groups especially as he put it: “…people who are gay, who were invisible, who were too scared to come out.  During gay liberation people became visible, people became politicized, and there was a Mardi Gras that was a symbol of the movement.”

Girl in a Mirror: A Portrait of Carol Jerrems

Tulsa: The Photography of Larry Clark

Slide Show: Up Close/Photographs of Candid Intimacy

(Please Click Image to View Slide Show)

Please Share This:

Share

Help, My Neighborhood Has Been Overrun By Baboons!!

Help, My Neighborhood Has Been Overrun By Baboons!!

My Neighborhood Has Been Overrun By Baboons is a hilarious animated four-minute short film directed by Australian filmmakers Cameron Edser and Michael Richards, with music by The Dairy Brothers.  The film had a huge premier on February 21st  as part of Tropfest 2010, viewed by a massive crowd of 75,000 at the Domain in Sydney.  The film won second place in the Tropfest 2010 Animated Shorts category.

In My Neighborhood Has Been Overrun By Baboons a poor guy wakes up one morning and is shocked to find that his home and entire neighborhood has been overrun by big baboons.  What if there was nothing you could do and nowhere you could hide?  Wouldn’t you go absolutely bananas?  Now this little film is just about as silly as it gets, but it does make an interesting point.  In some ways, at times we all might get the feeling that our neighborhood has been overrun by baboons!

My Neighborhood Has Been Overrun By Baboons

Please Share This:

Share

We Have Decided Not to Die: Spiritual Rituals of Reversible Destiny

We Have Decided Not to Die: Spiritual Rituals of Reversible Destiny

We Have Decided Not to Die is an award-winning, very unusual and deeply intriguing eight-minute short film by the Australian filmmaker Daniel Askill.  A Triptych.  Three Rituals. Three Figures. Three modern-day journeys of transcendence.  From the post-modern quirk school of filmmaking, this piece transforms the power of ritual actions into an emotional allegory that creates a world beyond evolution, creationism and intelligent design.  From a mental state where logic drops away, the film embarks upon a visually lyrical odyssey along a poetically surreal road to reversible destiny, where death is no longer inevitable.

We Have Decided Not to Die: Spiritual Rituals of Reversible Destiny

Please Share This:

An Astonishing Sea Rescue in Incredible Shrinking Sydney

An Astonishing Sea Rescue in Incredible Shrinking Sydney

Keith Loutit, a photographer based in Sydney (AU), is interested in “the little things in life” and his remarkable short films make Sydney look like a model city. Bathtub IV depicts a rescue operation carried out by the Westpac Rescue Helicopter Service in Sydney. Loutit shot the short film using some amazing tilt-shift time-lapse photography. His tilt-shift photography narrows the depth of field, making Sydney look like a miniature city. The “model city” effect combines selective focus, the angle of light, and speed of playback to trick the viewer into thinking they’re looking at footage of a scale model. Elevation is also an important factor. By positioning the camera above the subject, the viewer looks down upon the scene, which dramatically enhances the effect.

Loutit’s work plays with focus, vantage, perspective and the viewer’s perceptions of reality. In doing so, he challenges his audience not to take their environment for granted. His short films detach the viewers from the real world, helping them once again to remember and recognize the old world charm of their surroundings.

An Astonishing Sea Rescue in Incredible Shrinking Sydney

Please Bookmark This:

The Art of Empathic Listening: “Mankind is No Island”

The Art of Empathic Listening: “Mankind is No Island”

Mankind Is No Island is a short documentary film made entirely with a cellphone camera.  The film was shot in New York City and Sydney, Australia.  Mankind Is No Island was named the winner of The 2008 New York Tropfest and was awarded a first-prize of $20,000.

The Art of Empathic Listening: “Mankind is No Island”

Please Bookmark This:

Share

Heath Ledger Portrait Wins 2008 Archibald Prize in Australia

Heath Ledger Portrait: The 2008 Archibald Prize

On Thursday, this portrait of a brooding Heath Ledger, which was painted shortly before the Australian actor died in January, was voted the most popular painting in the 2008 Archibald Prize competition.  The Archibald Prize is Australia’s top art prize for portraiture. Ledger posed for the portrait in December at Ledger’s family home in Perth, Australia.

Ledger, who was best known for his role as a conflicted gay cowboy in the 2005 movie Brokeback Mountain, died at the age of 28 in New York on January 22, 2008.  Artist Vincent Fantauzzo, 29, had been friends with Ledger for many years.

The portrait features a bare-chested Ledger against a black background, looking straight out of the canvas with two other images of the actor at the sides whispering into his ears.  Fantauzzo refused offers to sell the painting and said that he had spoken to Ledger’s family, who requested that the portrait be donated to the New South Wales Gallery in Sydney, Australia.

Remembering Heath Ledger (1979-2008)

TechnoratiTechnorati: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Please Share This:

Share

%d bloggers like this: