The Factory: A Story of Love, Sacrifice and the Human Condition

The Factory: A Story of Love, Sacrifice and the Human Condition

The Factory is an acclaimed live-action short film directed by Aly Muritiba, which is a finalist in The Wrap’s 2012 Short Films Festival, a new festival presenting 12 award-winning short films selected from this year’s top international film festivals. The Factory has received more than 50 prizes at international film festivals, including: Best Short Film at the Hollywood Brazilian Film Festival 2012 (LA, United States); Best Short Film at the World Wide Short Films 2012 (Toronto, Canada); Best Short Film at the 14th Encounters South American Cinema de Marseille (Marseille, France); Special Jury Mention at the 34th Festival of Short Film Clermon-Ferrand (France); and Best Film Award at the Lake Film Festival (Italy).

The Factory tells a daring and emotional story of family ties, taking an an intense journey beneath the hard surface of a brutal prison environment, to show the spark and beauty of the human condition. The film takes place on visiting day at the prison. An inmate has convinced his mother to take a huge risk, smuggling a cell phone into the penitentiary for him. Lindalva prepares food to take to her son, while her son, Metruti, shaves and dresses in his best clothes to welcome her. Today is a very special day, and Metruti really needs to make that phone call.

The Factory: A Story of Love, Sacrifice and the Human Condition (Official Trailer)

The Factory: A Story of Love, Sacrifice and the Human Condition (Full Version)

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Another Freak-Show Big-Money Art Auction: Warhol’s “Double Elvis” Brings $37 Million

Another Freak-Show Big-Money Art Auction: Warhol’s “Double Elvis” Brings

An iconic portrait of Elvis Presley by pop artist Andy Warhol went for $37 Million when it hit the auction block tonight at Sotheby’s. The life-size 1963 silkscreen ink and spray paint piece, Double Elvis (Ferus Type), epitomizes Warhol’s obsessions with fame, stardom and the public image, according to Sotheby’s. Previously estimated to sell for $30 million to $50 million, it was included in the auction house’s May 9th sale of post-war and contemporary art. Art auctions have turned into freak-show casinos, spectacles where the uber-rich can act out as much in public as possible, trying to buy immortality, become a part of art history, make headlines and create big profits. They are despicable for what they do to art, for the bad magic of making mysteriously powerful things turn into numbers.

The silver background of Double Elvis (Ferus Type), along with the subtle variations in tone is said to give the serial imagery a sense of rhythmic variation that recalls the artist’s masterpiece, 200 One Dollar Bills, completed the previous year. That work soared to nearly $44 million or four times its estimate in 2009 and achieved the highest price of any work at the fall auctions. But it was a work from Warhol’s Death and Disaster series that set the artist’s record, which still stands. Green Car Crash (Green Car Burning), also from 1963, more than doubled its estimate and sold for $71.7 million in 2007, at the height of the art market boom.

In the Double Elvis work, Presley is dressed as a cowboy, shooting a gun. Sotheby’s describes him in the work as “a Hollywood icon of the sixties rather than the rebellious singer who shook the world of music in the sixties.” The double in the title refers to a shadowy image of Presley in the same pose that appears next to him in the work.

Bob Dylan Holding “Double Elvis” at The Factory, NYC, 1965

On an eagerly-awaited visit to The Factory in 1965 for one of Warhol’s “Screen Test” sessions, Bob Dylan and his crew, along with their host Andy Warhol, were photographed on the set. At the session, Andy gave Dylan a great double image of Elvis. Dylan departed, having tied the Elvis image to the top of his station wagon, like a deer poached out of season. Much later, Dylan said that he’d traded the “Double Elvis” (now worth millions) to his manager for a couch!

Bob Dylan’s Screen Test, The Factory, NYC, 1965

Andy Warhol’s “Double Elvis (Ferus Type)” at May 9th Sotheby’s Auction

Andy Warhol’s Pop Art: A Documentary (2000)

Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a leading figure in the visual pop art movement. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became a renowned and sometimes controversial artist. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture and advertisement. He worked in a range of media, including painting, printmaking, sculpture, film and music. He founded Interview Magazine and was the author of numerous books, including The Philosophy of Andy Warhol and Popism: The Warhol Sixties. Andy Warhol is also notable as a gay man who lived openly as such before the gay liberation movement. His studio in New York City, The Factory, was a famous gathering place that brought together distinguished intellectuals, drag queens, playwrights, Bohemian street people, Hollywood celebrities and wealthy patrons.

Andy Warhol’s Pop Art: A Documentary (2000)

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Never Before Seen Photographs of the Young Andy Warhol

Warhol Behind His Marilyn Print

Warhol Editing Film at The Factory in NYC

Warhol Filming at The Factory with His Assistant, Gerard Malanga

Warhol With All-American Faces

Never Before Seen Photographs of the Young Andy Warhol

Before They Were Famous: Behind The Lens of William John Kennedy is an extraordinary collection of images by the photographer William John Kennedy, which is currently on exhibition at the new gallery Site/109 in New York City. The collection presents a number of never-before-seen photographs of Andy Warhol and Robert Indiana, among them Warhol’s Marilyn Monroe and Indiana’s LOVE, taken by Mr. Kennedy in the mid-60’s when they were both just emerging American artists.

The fact that these early images of the two iconic American artists happened isn’t necessarily the exciting part. It’s that the amazingly early, naïve portraits of the artists with their own works were created before they were famous. These early images sat untouched for over 50 years, until Kennedy uncovered them within his archives and decided it was time to finally print this project.

Full Circle: Before They Were Famous

William John Kennedy’s Photographs of Andy Warhol

Photo-Gallery: Before He Was Famous: Andy Warhol

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Andy Warhol’s Cowboy “Double Elvis” Could Bring $50 Million at Auction

Andy Warhol’s Cowboy “Double Elvis (Ferus Type)” Could Bring $50 Million at Auction

An iconic portrait of Elvis Presley by pop artist Andy Warhol is poised to go for as much as $50 million when it hits the auction block in May at Sotheby’s. The life-size 1963 painting, Double Elvis (Ferus Type), epitomizes Warhol’s obsessions with fame, stardom and the public image, according to Sotheby’s. Estimated to sell for $30 million to $50 million, it will be included in the auction house’s May 9th sale of post-war and contemporary art.

The silver background of Double Elvis (Ferus Type), along with the subtle variations in tone give the serial imagery a sense of rhythmic variation that recalls the artist’s masterpiece, 200 One Dollar Bills, completed the previous year. That work soared to nearly $44 million or four times its estimate in 2009 and achieved the highest price of any work at the fall auctions. But it was a work from Warhol’s Death and Disaster series that set the artist’s record, which still stands. Green Car Crash (Green Car Burning), also from 1963, more than doubled its estimate and sold for $71.7 million in 2007, at the height of the art market boom.

In the Double Elvis work, Presley is dressed as a cowboy, shooting a gun. Sotheby’s describes him in the work as “a Hollywood icon of the sixties rather than the rebellious singer who shook the world of music in the sixties.” The double in the title refers to a shadowy image of Presley in the same pose that appears next to him in the work.

Bob Dylan Holding “Double Elvis” at The Factory, NYC, 1965

On an eagerly-awaited visit to The Factory in 1965 for one of Warhol’s “Screen Test” sessions, Bob Dylan and his crew, along with their host Andy Warhol, were photographed on the set. At the session, Andy gave Dylan a great double image of Elvis. Dylan departed, having tied the Elvis image to the top of his station wagon, like a deer poached out of season. Much later, Dylan said that he’d traded the “Double Elvis” (now worth millions) to his manager for a couch!

Bob Dylan’s Screen Test, The Factory, NYC, 1965

Andy Warhol’s “Double Elvis (Ferus Type)” at May 9th Sotheby’s Auction

Andy Warhol’s Pop Art: A Documentary (2000)

Andy Warhol (1928-1987) was a leading figure in the visual pop art movement. After a successful career as a commercial illustrator, Warhol became a renowned and sometimes controversial artist. His works explore the relationship between artistic expression, celebrity culture and advertisement. He worked in a range of media, including painting, printmaking, sculpture, film and music. He founded Interview Magazine and was the author of numerous books, including The Philosophy of Andy Warhol and Popism: The Warhol Sixties. Andy Warhol is also notable as a gay man who lived openly as such before the gay liberation movement. His studio in New York City, The Factory, was a famous gathering place that brought together distinguished intellectuals, drag queens, playwrights, Bohemian street people, Hollywood celebrities and wealthy patrons.

Andy Warhol’s Pop Art: A Documentary (2000)

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Andy Warhol and Friends: On Set and Back Home

Andy Warhol and Friends: On Set and Back Home

Andy Warhol and Friends

Andy Warhol and Friends is a new collection of photographs of Andy Warhol and his circle of friends.  In this extensive set of photographs, Warhol and his film crew shoot the 1968 Lonesome Cowboys movie in the hot Arizona desert, and other images capture Andy and his sidekicks posing and generally acting very “artsy-campy” well into the 1980s.

“Warhol’s Cinema” from The Factory: 1963-1968

Warhol’s Cinema is a 1989 BBC-TV Channel 4 documentary about a number of films made Andy Warhol in the 1960s.  During the five year span of his obsession with films, Warhol made more than 50 films between 1963-1968.  Most of his movies were 16-millimeter films and included Chelsea Girls, Empire, Sleep, Kiss, My Hustler and Lonesome Cowboys.  He made many of the films in his mid-town studio, known as The Factory, where the young people in his offbeat cortège, alternately beautiful and bizarre, spent much or most of their time.  That group of followers included, among many others, Baby Jane Holzer, Gerard Malanga, Paul America, Holly Woodlawn, Joe Dellasandro, Chuck Weir and Edie Sedgwick.

Andy Warhol’s Cinema: A Mirror to the Sixties

Andy Warhol: A PBS American Masters Documentary (2006)

Slide Show: Andy Warhol and Friends/On Set and Back Home

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Andy Warhol’s Cinema: A Mirror to the Sixties

Andy Warhol’s Cinema: A Mirror to the Sixties

“Warhol’s Cinema” from The Factory: 1963-1968

Warhol’s Cinema is a 1989 BBC-TV Channel 4 documentary about a number of films made Andy Warhol in the 1960s. During the five year span of his obsession with films, Warhol made more than 50 films between 1963-1968. Most of his movies were 16-millimeter films and included Chelsea Girls, Empire, Sleep, Kiss, My Hustler and Lonesome Cowboys. He made many of the films in his mid-town studio, known as The Factory, where the young people in his offbeat cortège, alternately beautiful and bizarre, spent much or most of their time. That group of followers included, among many others, Baby Jane Holzer, Gerard Malanga, Paul America, Holly Woodlawn, Joe Dellasandro, Chuck Weir and Edie Sedgwick.

Warhol’s Shiny Silver Tin-Foil Factory

Andy Warhol’s original Factory was often thought of as the Silver Factory by the people who came to derive a sense of attachment from being involved in or even just hanging around the sense of creative excitement that was evolving there. This was amplified by the national social (and political) landscape at that time, where fragmentation was gaining increasing momentum. The sense of excitement around the Factory derived, to a large degree, from an energized feeling that it was possible to openly embrace a range of experiences that had previously been socially forbidden.

In this way, the shiny, shimmering silver represented the decadence of the scene, as well as the “proto-glam” of the early sixties. Silver, fractured mirrors and tin foil were the basic decorating materials loved by the early amphetamine users of the sixties. By combining the industrial structure of his unfurnished Factory art studio with the glitter of silver and what it represented, Warhol was commenting on American values, as he did so often in his art. The years spent at the Factory were known as the Silver Era, not solely because of its design, but also because of the decadent and carefree lifestyle full of money, parties, drugs and fame.

The Factory became a meeting place for a large number of artists and musicians such as Lou Reed, Bob Dylan, Brian Jones, Truman Capote, Robert Mapplethorpe, Patti Smith, William Burroughs, Baby Jane Holzer, Anita Pallenberg, Philip Johnson and Mick Jagger. Other, less frequent visitors included Salvador Dalí, Tennessee Williams and Allen Ginsberg. At the same time, Warhol collaborated with Lou Reed’s influential New York rock band, The Velvet Underground, and in 1965 he designed the famous cover for The Velvet Underground & Nico, the band’s debut album. Paradoxically, however, no matter how rose-colored the glasses, the silvery glitter was after all only tawdry tin foil. In this sense, Warhol had built a sham to reflect the broader social sham that he claimed to be rejecting. Unfortunately, many members of his Factory entourage took the sham for real and paid dearly for it in or with their lives.

Andy Warhol’s Cinema: A Mirror to the Sixties

“Andy Warhol’s Cinema” from The Factory: 1963-1968

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Speechless: Dylan Alone in Warhol’s Photobooth

Attempts at realistic self-portraits have always been a means of expression for inward-looking romanticism, melancholy, and trying to stop time for a moment to preserve a fleeting physical and emotional presence. Think of Van Gogh, Rembrandt, Picasso, Henri Cartier-Bresson and Chuck Close, to name just a few.

Andy Warhol introduced the idea of the movie self-portrait. Warhol’s Screen Tests were filmed from early 1964 until November 1966. Visitors to The Factory who had potential “star” quality would be seated in front of a tripod mounted camera and asked to be as still as possible. They were told not to blink while the camera was running, a camera that was loaded with a minute’s worth of film. People made their own movie self portraits, while sitting all alone in the room with the camera turned on.

The range of emotions that flickered in the eyes and nervous facial twitches and grimaces revealed a tremendous amount about the underlying person behind the mask, and infused these portraits with waves of feelings that could rarely be communicated with a still image. Even though no one else is present in the room, the subject does not really have control. Something vulnerable is revealed. Waves of feelings and emotions and insecurities pass before our eyes. Here’s the screen test/movie self portrait by an obviously uncomfortable Bob Dylan.

A Warhol Screen Test: Bob Dylan’s Movie Self Portrait

Bob Dylan: The B&W Photographs

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