Hurry Up and Wait: The Lonesome World of Truck Drivers

Hurry Up and Wait: The Lonesome World of Truck Drivers

Hurry Up and Wait is a photographic essay by artists James Tribble and Tracey Mancenido-Tribble, a poetic meditation about America’s trucking culture.  With the long tradition of road photography in mind, the Tribbles spent over a year driving across the states as truck drivers.  Their journey is documented here in photographs that range from portraits of drivers they encountered, to shots from the open road, in a year-long effort to understand the subculture that literally drives America’s consumerism.  The photographs illuminate both the openness of the road and it’s lonesome journey, with images that bring new light to the harsh beauty in the world of a truck driver.

Kris Kristofferson: This Old Road

Slide Show: The Lonesome World of Truck Drivers

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The Poor in America: Friends and Neighbors in the Heartland

The Poor in America: Friends and Neighbors in the Heartland

For some people, our economy may be turning around, but millions of families are at risk of going hungry, in one of the richest nations on earth.  The poorest people in America are those who are the first to feel the downturn, and will be the last to feel the country’s financial recovery.  The hardworking poor in America’s heartland, with their long and deep traditions in mining, manufacturing and military service, are increasingly seen in food pantry lines, feeling ashamed and angry.  Their stories and images push beyond stereotypes and reveal a hidden America of families living in poverty, which is both surprising and haunting.

Friends and Neighbors: The Recession’s Unseen Victims

Poverty in the Hills of Central Appalachia

A Hidden America: Children of the Appalachian Mountains

Kris Kristofferson: This Old Road

Slide Show: The Poor in America/Friends and Neighbors in the Heartland

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Kris Kristofferson: Melancholy Reflections on Love, Separation, Loss and Mortality

Kris Kristofferson: Music from Closer to the Bone

Kris Kristofferson: Melancholy Reflections on Love, Separation, Loss and Mortality

Fill your heart for the morning tomorrow
You’ve still got a long way to grow
And the love that you’re dreaming will guide you
And live like a song in your soul.

Kris Kristofferson has always been a reflective musician, thinking about the mysteries of the soul with honest observations about love, separation, loss and mortality.  The soul, to which Kristofferson addresses the majority of his concerns on his excellent new album, Closer To The Bone, is something that he’ll still be trying to figure out until the very day of his final ache, his final breath and his last fading dream.  He sounds solemn and determined to finally reach some of the answers that he’s been seeking for so many long years.  Most of the album revolves around simple guitar playing and  simple melodies, which never fail to bring a sense of gravity into focus and to make all of his revelations sound as if they were there all along, but it just took an older him to finally see or hear them.

Closer to the Bone can be experienced as a sequel to its much-acclaimed predecessor, This Old Road.  While Closer to the Bone doesn’t entirely replicate the seemingly casual approach of This Old Road, it aims to deliver the same sense of earthy simplicity.  While his new album approaches the same profound issues as its predecessor, the intimate sense of the new album strongly conveys a general mood of reflection about where we all are at this end of life.

Both albums mark the latest works of a distinguished career that has given us such classic American songs as Me and Bobby McGee, Sunday Morning Coming Down and Help Me Make It Through the Night; stardom in such feature films as Lonestar, The Blade Trilogy, A Soldier’s Daughter Never Cries, Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid and A Star is Born; honors including three Grammy Awards and a Golden Globe Award; and years of outspoken political and social activism.  This November, he will be honored as a BMI Icon at the performing rights organization’s Country Awards.  Kristofferson is currently a member of the Songwriter Hall of Fame and the Country Music Hall of Fame.

Kris Kristofferson: Closer to the Bone (2009)

Kris Kristofferson: This Old Road (2006)

Slide Show: Kristofferson Reflects on Love, Separation, Loss and Mortality

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