Time Piece: The Story of Everyman’s Torment

Time Piece: The Story of Everyman’s Torment

Time Piece is the acclaimed 1965 nine-minute experimental short film that was writ­ten, di­rect­ed and pro­duced ​by Jim Hen­son; the film also starred Henson. Beginning in the spring of 1964, nearly ten years after the introduction of the Muppets, Henson filmed the short film on weekends and late nights between his commercial projects and Muppet appearances. Premiered at New York City’s Mu­se­um of Mod­ern Art in May of 1965, Time Piece en­joyed an eigh­teen-​month run at one Man­hat­tan movie the­ater and in 1966 was nom­i­nat­ed for the Acade­my Award for Out­stand­ing Short Sub­ject.

Time Piece is the story of Everyman, frustrated by the typical tasks of a typical day. With a rhythmic soundtrack and visual clock motif, the film follows follows a nameless man through his mundane daily activities, a montage intercut with surreal fantasy and pop-culture references. The film touches upon themes such as man’s dis­lo­ca­tion in time, time sig­na­tures, time as a philo­soph­i­cal con­cept and slav­ery to time. The film’s only dialog is a repeating cry of “Help!”from Henson, who can’t help but sound like his Kermit the Frog counterpart.

Time Piece: The Story of Everyman’s Torment

Please Share This:

Switch: If You Come to a Fork in the Road, Take It!

Switch: If You Come to a Fork in the Road, Take It!

Switch is a 4-minute short animated film by the young French filmmakers Jean-Julien Pous and Pierre Prinzbach, who describe the film as “a metaphysical thought on the pressure of time on our society.”  Switch recently won the Jury Grand Prize, Folie-Ô-Skop, in Québec. The film takes place in a surreal world where people are born with clocks on their backs, and life nothing more than a constant rat-race.  Humanity, as portrayed through the eyes of a business-calibrated mannequin, is in a struggle within itself about the ever-increasing demands of time in the face of important choices that need to be made.  The mannequin attempts to cope with this struggle by doubling itself, which then leads to an infinite re-doubling of itself.  Its attempted solution only leads the mannequin to experience a sense of anonymity among the rapidly accumulating multitudes of its identical selves.  Further, the unsuccessful solution leads the mannequin’s frustrating journey to end in a state of solitude, confronted by a timeless, boundless oceanic world.

Switch: If You Come to a Fork in the Road, Take It!

Please Share This:

A Perfectly Still Moment: The Eternal Sands of Time

A Perfectly Still Moment: The Eternal Sands of Time

Photography by:  Christian Chaize

The Eternal Sands of Time is a wonderfully elegant photograph by Christian Chaize, a renowned photographer based in Lyons, France.  Christian Chaize has really mastered the art of capturing magical still-life portraits of subdued dramas in the details of everyday life.  The subtleties of this stunning black and white photograph, its exquisitely marvelous sense of texture and shading, the wonderful use of delicate tone, the mix of quiet peacefulness with a subdued sense of pathos.  There’s just so much to see here, so much to love.  Amazing.  Perfect.

Please Share This:

A Slow Perception of Time: Youth, Growth, Change, Life….

A Slow Perception of Time: Youth, Growth, Change, Life….

Slow is a brilliant 2-min. animated stop-motion short film by Xaver Xylophon, which uses different time layers to express an altered perception of time. The film is dreamy and pensive, but also creatively abstract with an irreverent-but-relevant feel. Sinking typography in the film gives Slow a look that’s très chic!

A Slow Perception of Time: Youth, Growth, Change, Life….

Please Share This:

No Time: Seeing Life Through the Lens of Death

No Time: Seeing Life Through the Lens of Death

No Time

In a rush this weekday morning,
I tap the horn as I speed past the cemetery
where my parents are buried
side by side under a smooth slab of granite.

Then, all day long, I think of him rising up
to give me that look
of knowing disapproval
while my mother calmly tells him to lie back down.

Billy Collins

U. S. Poet Laureate, 2001-2003

Seeing Life Through the Lens of Death

During an interview focusing upon our perceptions of the dead, Collins touched upon his portrayal of death in the poem No Time:

“The underlying theme of Western poetry is mortality. The theme of carpe diem asks us to seize the day because we have only a limited number of them. To see life through the lens of death is to approach the condition of gratitude for the gift, or simply the fact, of our existence. And as Wallace Stevens said, Death is the mother of beauty. Only the perishable can be beautiful, which is why we are unmoved by artificial flowers….

We visit graves because they give the illusion that the person is somewhere, in some place. But like a mandala, the gravestoneitself is a focusing device. The treatment of the dead as if they were still alive is ancient. The Egyptians would entomb you with your favorite food, flowers, even pets (poor dears). In that way, maybe we are all in some form of hopeful denial.”

No Time: Seeing Life Through the Lens of Death

Animation by: Jeff Scher

Please Remember Me and Bookmark This:

%d bloggers like this: