Runaway: A Comical Criticism of the Bourgeoisie

Runaway: A Comical Criticism of the Bourgeoisie

Runaway is an award-winning, cleverly satirical animated short film by the Canadian animator Cordell Barker.  Like many acclaimed animators, new work from him is a rare and eagerly awaited occurrence.  Runaway is just his third short film, after the Oscar-nominated The Cat Came Back in 1988 and the Oscar-nominated Strange Invaders in 2001.

The film is full of cartoonish antics and revolves around an undefined moment in the eighteenth century, recreating the journey of a locomotive that collides with an unhurried cow as it crosses the tracks and rapidly begins to hurtle wildly out of control.  As the situation becomes more dire a class-conflict breaks out, and while naturally there are victims, in the end everyone turns out to be equal.

Runaway: A Comical Criticism of the Bourgeoisie

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Trainset Ghetto: Ultra Realistic Miniature Slum Landscapes

Trainset Ghetto: Ultra Realistic Miniature Slum Landscapes

Photography by:  Peter Feigenbaum, NYC

Trainset Ghetto is a series of photographs by Peter Feigenbaum that features increasingly bizarre and phantasmagorical juxtapositions of time, scale, and neighborhood architectural vernaculars, in which his invented, rubble-strewn New York City 1970s miniature slum landscape collides with the almost-gentrified brownstone environment of south Park Slope.  Feigenbaum’s ultra-realistic railroad sets include all the graffiti and urban decay of a typical downtown stroll.

Trainset Ghetto: Miniature Slum Landscapes

Slide Show: Trainset Ghetto/Ultra Realistic Miniature Slum Landscapes

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Train/Bed: Only One of Eight Million

Train/Bed: Only One of Eight Million

Train/Bed is a 2-min. stop-motion short film by Lam Thuy Vo. The film was created for a 2008 Brooklyn Filmmakers Collective screening. Set in New York City and Brooklyn, Train/Bed is a visual essay, a form of visual storytelling, about the feelings of anonymity, sadness and loneliness of life in the big city.

Train/Bed: Only One of Eight Million

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Photo of the Day: The Shiny, Steely Train

Photo of the Day: The Shiny, Steely Train

Photography by: Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

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Photos of the Day: Train of Thought

Photos of the Day: Train of Thought

Photography by: Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

Train of Thought

Animated Short Film by: Jeff Scher

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Christmas in New York: A Miniature New York City Through a Looking Glass

Christmas in New York: A Miniature New York City Through a Looking Glass

The Holiday Train Show, at the New York Botanical Garden in the Bronx, is in its 17th year. Sitting like islands in a warm pool in the central palm gallery at the New York Botanical Garden are two landmarks that welcomed early-20th-century immigrants to Manhattan: the main building of Ellis Island and the Statue of Liberty. They seem appropriate here in the Bronx too, at the entrance to the annual Holiday Train Show, because this exhilarating exhibition makes you feel a little like an alien visitor just coming ashore; everything familiar is skewed and strange in the fragrant, humid air.

Lush tropical plants surround these classic gateways to New York’s harbor. The stonework of Ellis Island’s building is made from elm bark. Its window mullions are formed from winged euonymus twigs. Its decorative eagles are constructed using alder cones and cloves. The roof is made with gourds, date vines and acorns. And Lady Liberty is draped in palm leaves and grasses, her torch a dried monarch flower embedded in half a pomegranate. The landmarks are as botanical as the surroundings.

The sounds of exclamations of amazement uttered by fellow immigrants, young and old, are accompanied by the steady whir of 14 electric trains and streetcars that run in loops around the city’s fancifully scrambled geography. It’s New York through a looking glass or, perhaps, through the eyes of a dizzied newcomer who fits pieces together according to sensation rather than location.

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Photo of the Day: I Paid Money, Now Where’s the Train?

Photo of the Day: I Paid Money, Now Where’s the Train?

Photography by: Joseph O. Holmes, NYC

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