Somewhere: Pigs Fly. And Sing. With Chickens!

Somewhere: Pigs Fly. And Sing. With Chickens!

Somewhere is a short film created by FMS, featuring a CG pig for the animal cruelty prevention charity, Animals Australia. The CG pig, named Peanut, takes viewers to a real factory farm before she sings Somewhere and flies to freedom.

There are many things in this world we are powerless to change, but this is not one of them. We all know how horrible factory farming is by now, and at the very least we owe all animals raised for food, a decent quality of life and protection from cruel treatment. This campaign encourages retailers, producers and consumers to work together to ensure the ethical care of animals.

Somewhere: Pigs Fly. And Sing. With Chickens!

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Monster Roll: Heroic Chefs Battle Sea Creatures in Epic Sushi Horror

Monster Roll: Heroic Chefs Battle Sea Creatures in Epic Sushi Horror

Monster Roll is a wildly imaginative, comedic short action film by Daniel Blank, where heroic sushi chefs face off against giant sea monsters in an epic battle with plenty of tentacle action. The ridiculously entertaining film provides a good balance of spectacular knife-wielding heroes, mixed with strong environmental themes.

Monster Roll: Heroic Chefs Battle Sea Creatures in Epic Sushi Horror

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A Heart-Melting Baby Elephant Rescue in Kenyan National Park

A Heart-Melting Baby Elephant Rescue in Kenyan National Park

When an eight-month-old baby elephant fell into a muddy watering hole at the Aboseli National Park in Kenya, a team of conservationists from Amboseli Trust for Elephants rushed to figure out a way to rescue the calf. Although she was just a baby and too small to climb out of the hole herself, the calf was too large for rescuers to lift out of the hole. Amboseli Trust for Elephants’ Vicki Fishlock used her Land Rover to force the calf’s mother away from the hole so that rescuers could reach the stranded elephant. After more than a half-hour, rescuers were able to finally get a rope around the calf and slowly pull her out of the hole.

They captured the rescue operation on video, which has a beautifully happy ending and rather hilarious off-camera commentary: “So this is Zombe’s calf, who we’re all delighted is so big and fat and healthy, until we have to pull her out of a hole!” After the rescue, Fishlock stated: “Relief! Rescues where family members are around are stressful, and I’m always happy when everyone is safely back in the cars. And I have to admit that the reunions always bring a tear to my eye. The intensity of their affection for each other is one of the things that makes elephants so special.”

Amboseli Trust for Elephants works to protect and study elephants in Kenya’s Amboseli National Park. They have a fantastic YouTube channel documenting their work, and you can watch more animal videos from their Fauna series here.

A Heart-Melting Baby Elephant Rescue in Kenyan National Park

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Let There Be Light!

Let There Be Light!

Light is a mesmerizing two-minute short film directed by David Parker for Sunday Paper. The film was shot over a couple nights in Los Angeles as two friends drove around with a camera exploring the city’s architecture and abandoned landscapes. Their work evolved into a project intended to bring awareness to energy waste. Bleeding, crying lights metaphorically parallel the ways in which we squander our natural resources without much thought. While the original sentiment remains, the film also grew into a poetic statement about a world run wild and the human tendency to exploit that which we hold dear.

Let There Be Light!

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Back to the Start: Choosing a More Sustainable Future

Back to the Start: Choosing a More Sustainable Future

Back to the Start is a stellar animated short film by the acclaimed animator Johnny Kelly, created at London’s esteemed Nexus Productions. The film very eloquently dramatizes the story of a farmer who slowly turns his family farm into an industrial animal factory before seeing the errors of his ways. When a crisis of conscience takes hold, the farmer returns to his low-impact ways and opts for a more sustainable future. All the while, Willie Nelson sings a cover of Coldplay’s The Scientist, the one that goes “…I’m going back to the start.” Both the film and the soundtrack were commissioned by Chipotle to emphasize the importance of developing a more sustainable food system.

Back to the Start: Choosing a More Sustainable Future

(Best Viewed in HD Full-Screen Mode)

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Sayonara: A Sad Farewell in an Era of Global Warming

Sayonara: A Sad Farewell in an Era of Global Warming

Sayonara is a beautiful four-minute animated short film by Canadian artist Eric Bates, a film he created while at Japan’s Kyoto University of Art and Design. The film is a mix of minimally rendered CG, detailed puppet model-making, and hand-drawn animation. Sayonara tells the story of two unlikely friends saying goodbye. A young man named Charles just lost his home to the encroaching sea and spends one last day with his best friend, a sea turtle, before moving on. Just in case you miss it, there’s a short sequence after the credits.

Sayonara: A Sad Farewell in an Era of Global Warming

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The Ghosts of British Shoe: A Haunting Narrative of Modern-Day Industrial Ruins

The Ghosts of British Shoe: A Haunting Narrative of Modern-Day Industrial Ruins

The Ghosts Of British Shoe is a four-minute documentary short film by English filmmaker Bill Newsinger, a powerful narrative of modern-day industrial ambition and loss. The film presents a hauntingly beautiful, but very lonely tour through the now-abandoned British United Shoe Machinery, with the  ghostly sounds and starkly riveting images of the factory’s decrepid ruins.

British United Shoe Machinery was the head office in Leicester, England, of a company that for most of the 20th century was the world’s largest manufacturer of footwear machinery and materials. In the 1960s and 1970s, it was Leicester’s biggest employer, employing more than 4,500 people locally and 9,500 workers worldwide.

The company was destroyed in 2000 by a private equity firm that bought it out and then quickly went bankrupt. The workers abruptly lost not only their life-long jobs, they also had their entire pensions stolen from under their noses. It’s made even more sad knowing now that the British government encouraged the company’s demise, vastly increasing its bureaucracy and running the industry into the ground. And this film shows the very sad, tragic outcome.

The Ghosts of British Shoe: A Haunting Narrative of Modern-Day Industrial Ruins

Photo-Gallery: The Ghosts of British Shoe

(Please Click Image to View Photo-Gallery)

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