Loom: A Visual Metaphor for Nature’s Cruel Cycle of Life and Death

Loom: A Visual Metaphor for Nature’s Cruel Cycle of Life and Death

Loom is a brilliant, award-winning five-minute CGI short film, made by students at the German design and storytelling collective Polynoid. Blending a variety of aesthetic and cultural influences, Polynoid’s multifaceted creative vision is nourished by interests in graffiti, nature, graphic novels, science and philosophy. With a rich observational eye for detail, Polynoid has established a strong visual language all of its own. Polynoid’s narrative technique combines new forms of storytelling with a shared interest in progressive sound design to create a minimalist, photo-real and abstract sensory experience.

Loom won The Best In Show at Siggraph, 2010, and just recently won the Best Animated Movie Award at Sehsüchte 2011 in Potsdam, Germany. Loom explores natural causal cycles through the visual metaphor of a moth caught in a spider’s web. The story of the moth’s drowning reveals a larger range of thematic concerns  about life and death from a tale told on a micro scale. The full-version of the film is presented below:

Loom: A Visual Metaphor for Nature’s Cruel Cycle of Life and Death

(Please View in HD Full-Screen Mode)

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Loom: A Moth Caught in Nature’s Complex Cycle

Loom: A Moth Caught in Nature’s Complex Cycle

Loom is a computer animated short film by Ilija Brunck at Polynoid, which tells the story of a moth being drowned in one of nature’s complex cycles.  The film received the Best in Show Award at the SIGGRAPH 2010 Computer Animation Festival.

Loom: A Moth Caught in Nature’s Complex Cycle (Trailer)

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Mindplotter: Dueling States of Hardcore Metallic Brutality vs. Peaceful Inspiration

Mindplotter: Dueling States of Hardcore Metallic Brutality vs. Peaceful Inspiration

Mindplotter (2007) is a 1/2 min. hardcore animated motion design short film by Directors Ilija Brunck, Jan Bitzera and Tom Weber, with sound/music by dAdA iNN and Roman Jungblut. Mindplotter received an Honorary Mention Award at the 2008 Ars Electronica. The directors are part of the Polynoid collaborative of digital workers; other animated short films by Polynoid filmmakers reviewed and posted here previously have included: Jangwa! (2005), 458nm (2006) and FlapFlap (2009).

Of special note is the acclaimed animated motion graphic short film 458nm, which has received more than thirteen awards at international film festivals. 458nm has been described as one of the most darkly savage films, both literally and figuratively, ever seen in any extra-terrestrial movie. The action in 458nm is performed by two biochemical snails who have dual characteristics: they are authentically organic in their behavior, but mechanical in their appearance. Seen from his perspective, Mindplotter is a precursor to 458nm, a harbinger of the aggressively dark, hardcore approach in some modern motion design films.

The directors describe Mindplotter as a symbol for what they believe is the essence of the creative process for every filmmaker in the field of animation. For them, the act of emerging creativity involves being able to switch between two stages, inspiration and creation. In Mindplotter emerging creativity is portrayed as both organic and mechanical, soft and hard, relaxed in the inspirational state of mind and brutal in the act of plotting and carrying out new artistic ideas. In the film, creativity is represented as the duality and interpenetration of internal and outer worlds, consisting of both the beauty of a sea creature and the menacing violence generated by a metallic fighting machine. Mindplotter conceives of creativity as the mutual interaction of peaceful introspection with aggressive acts into the external world, violently and destructively staking its claims to artistic innovation.

However, while it professes to understand creativity as a mutually interactive duality, rather than in terms of polar opposite states, the film’s view of artistic creativity as one that aggressively establishes itself by destroying the old order of things is in fact a polarized one. Mindplotter disregards the many possibilities of more peaceful declarations of creative discovery. In this way, the film fails to pay attention to or recognize the fact that by choosing to go down one road, the course of dark and destructive aggressiveness, there were an infinite number of other paths not taken, paths that might well have turned out to be as good or even better.

Mindplotter: Dueling States of Hardcore Metallic Brutality vs. Peaceful Inspiration

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